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11

Become a Family Peer Advocate (FPA)

Family Peer Advocates are valuable professionals within the child serving system. They are uniquely qualified to work with families based on their first-hand experience as the parent/caregiver of a young person with a social, emotional, behavioral, health, or developmental disability. This experience, combined with additional Parent Empowerment (PEP) training, allows them to provide peer support to parents of children with similar challenges.

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Benefit Development Resource Guide

The Benefit Development Resource Guide (Resource Guide) is designed to assist employees who are responsible for developing the benefits and entitlements necessary to fund services for individuals served by OPWDD and voluntary provider agencies. It is not intended to be read from cover to cover, though those new to the topics discussed may wish to do so. The Resource Guide is primarily intended to be used as a reference during the process of assisting individuals in developing the benefits necessary to fund their care.

This guide provides detailed information about conducting eligibility investigations, protecting assets, and applying for Medicaid, the OPWDD Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Waiver, Supplemental Security Income (SSI), Social Security benefits (SSDI), Medicare, and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP – formerly called Food Stamps). The manual consists of this introduction and the following sections:

  • Benefit Development
  • Liability for Services
  • Medicaid
  • Home and Community Based Services Waiver
  • Supplemental Security Income
  • Social Security Benefits 
  • Work Incentives 
  • Medicare
  • Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program
  • Resource Management
  • Additional Resources

13

Building the Legacy: IDEA 2004

This website was created to provide a "one-stop shop" for resources related to IDEA and its implementing regulations, released on August 3, 2006.

The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) is a law ensuring services to children with disabilities throughout the nation. IDEA governs how states and public agencies provide early intervention, special education and related services to more than 6.5 million eligible infants, toddlers, children and youth with disabilities.

Infants and toddlers with disabilities (birth-2) and their families receive early intervention services under IDEA Part C. Children and youth (ages 3-21) receive special education and related services under IDEA Part B.

14

Bullying & Students with Disabilities

This publication provides information for parents and families and schools about the laws, regulations and policies of bullying and harassment in schools. 

15

Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs (CYSHCN) Program

Children with special health care needs have an illness or condition for which they need extra health care and support services. These children might have a serious or long lasting: 

  • Physical condition;
  • Intellectual or development disability, and/or
  • Behavioral or emotional condition.

16

Community, Work and Independence, Inc.

Community, Work & Independence, Inc (CWI), headquartered in Glens Falls, NY, offers a diverse array of services for individuals with disabilities in Warren, Washington, Saratoga and Essex Counties.  Services include:  Residential, Day Habilitation, Community Supports, Pre-vcational and Employment Services, Clinical Services and Consumer Directed Personal Assistance Program. Funding sources include OPWDD, OMH, ACCES-VR and DOH.

17

Developmental Disability Respite for Bronx & Manhattan

This program offers day, overnight and weekend respite services for families who reside in Manhattan and the Bronx with children or adults who have developmental disabilities.

Consumers will be cared for at a freestanding site to allow families some rest time or to take care of personal issues, or in the event of an emergency.

18

Developmental Disability State Operations Offices (DDSOOs)

Developmental Disabilities State Operations Offices (DDSOOs) administer and oversee state operations for the Office for People With Developmental Disabilities (OPWDD), including the direct delivery of services and supports to people with developmental disabilities by state staff.  By focusing on local supports and services, statewide quality and consistency, and enhanced networking to promote best practices, DDSOOs are able to provide a consistent approach and culture, so that individuals and their families can expect continuous quality improvement in all services delivered directly by OPWDD across the state.

DDSOOs are responsible for the following activities:

  • development and monitoring of OPWDD systems improvement (e.g., continuous quality improvement processes, plans of corrective action (POCAs), informed consent and Behavior Management Committees);
  • offering specialized supports/services and service delivery in the areas of clinical and food services, waiver services and volunteers/senior companions;
  • acting in the capacity of advocate when responding to stakeholder questions and legislative inquiries;
  • oversight of support services (e.g., Medicaid compliance, HIPAA compliance and clinical records review);
  • oversight of the Statewide Technical Assistance Team, which provides pre-survey and focused technical assistance activities to campus-based ICFs and other state-operated community-based residential programs in which quality improvement issues have been identified; and ensures ongoing compliance with federal requirements and  that program certification is maintained;
  • management, on the local level, a variety of OPWDD statewide electronic billing and recordkeeping systems
  • oversight of the day-to-day administration of State-operated Family Care; and
  • oversight and coordination of fire safety initiatives, including development of evacuation plans in state-operated programs, and establishing and maintaining working relationships with local fire departments.

Eligibility for services is determined by the Developmental Disabilities Regional Offices (DDROs). Please contact the Eligibility Coordinator of the Regional Office representing the county in which the individual/family lives.

Lastly, DDSOOs act in a supporting role to DD Regional Offices in the areas of service development, local management of individual and community supports and crisis intervention.

View DDSOOs using our MSNavigator Mapping Tool. 

19

Disability Dating: Tips & Advice for Disabled Dating

This site provides a listing of dating tips for men and women with advice ranging from what to do on a first date to places to go when you have landed yourself a date. Dating tips are for all singles looking for romance, but mainly concentrate on disability dating advice.

20

Disability Employment Initiative

The Disability Employment Initiative's (DEI) strives to:

  • Improve educational, training, and employment opportunities and outcomes for adults with disabilities who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits, by refining and expanding already identified successful public workforce strategies;
  • Help these individuals with disabilities find a path into the middle class through exemplary and model service delivery by the public workforce system;
  • Improve coordination and collaboration among employment, training and asset development programs implemented at state and local levels, including the expansion of the public workforce investment system's capacity to serve as Employment Networks under the Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work Program; and
  • Build effective community partnerships that leverage public and private resources to better serve individuals with disabilities and improve employment outcomes.
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Developed by the Council on Children and Families and Funded by the Developmental Disabilities Planning Council