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Assistive Technology

Assistive technologies include equipment, appliances and assistive aids that enable people, including those who have physical or sensory limitations, to increase their mobility and/or ability to communicate and live more comfortably.

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Assistive Technology

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11

College-level Reading - Tips and Tools to Help with Comprehension and Fluency

This is a guide for parents and students and provides a quick overview of tools and strategies to aid comprehension and fluency while reading college level text.

12

College: You Can Do It! Tip Sheet

This tip sheet provides helpful information to help students with disabilities prepare for college.

The document covers three phases: 

  • Preparing for college while in high school.
  • Staying in college, which requires numerous self-management skills.
  • Preparing to move beyond college and into a career.

13

Disability Resource Clearinghouse and Navigators

The Justice Center’s Disability Resource Clearinghouse provides information about disability-related programs, services, laws and regulations. This Clearinghouse links to resources from local, state, federal and national agencies, as well as nonprofit organizations. 

NEED FURTHER ASSISTANCE?

If you cannot find the information you need, call a Disability Navigator toll-free at 1-800-624-4143.  Relay users, please dial 7-1-1 or email infoassistance@justicecenter.ny.gov.  

14

Disability.Gov

Disability.gov is the federal government website for comprehensive information about disability-related programs, services, policies, laws and regulations. The site links to thousands of resources from many different federal government agencies, as well as state and local governments and nonprofit organizations across the country.

Every day, new resources are added to Disability.gov’s 10 main subject areas: Benefits, Civil Rights, Community Life, Education, Emergency Preparedness, Employment, Health, Housing, Technology and Transportation. You’ll find information on topics such as Social Security disability benefits, job accommodations for employees with disabilities, accessible housing, and organizations in your state that can help you find a job or live independently.

Please keep in mind that Disability.gov is an “information and referral” website, which means almost every time you select a resource, you will go to another website. For example, a resource about Social Security disability benefits may direct you to  Social Security Administration (www.ssa.gov). Disability.gov is not responsible for the maintenance, accuracy or accessibility of information on these websites.

15

Early Intervention Program

The New York State Early Intervention Program (EIP) is part of the nationwide EIP. It is for infants and toddlers under three years of age who may not be making progress like other children because of a developmental delay or disability. A disability means that a child has a diagnosed physical or mental condition that may lead to developmental problems. These include, but are not limited to, autism, Down syndrome, motor disorders, or vision and hearing problems. A developmental delay means a child is behind in some area of development, such as growth, learning and thinking, or communicating.

The first step is your child's referral to the EIP in the county where you live. All counties in New York State (NYS) and New York City have an EIP. Children who may need services must first be referred to the EIP. Parents can refer their own child to the EIP if they have a concern about their child's development. In NYS, certain professionals are required to refer children to the EIP if a developmental problem is suspected. After referral, your child will be evaluated by qualified professionals. Your county EIP or the New York City EIP will help you get services if your child is found to be eligible. Health insurance, including private insurance and Medicaid, may be used to pay for early intervention services. EIP services must be provided at no cost to you and will not affect your insurance coverage.

View Early Intervention Programs using our MSNavigator Mapping Tool.

 

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endABUSE of People with Disabilities

endAbuse of People with Disabilities is a new website that provides a repository of accurate and reliable resources about the abuse of people with disabilities. Users can access multi-media content that offers information about the forms of abuse, targets of abuse, peer-to-peer support, and advocacy.  Additionally, those in need have the ability to get immediate assistance from the "Get Help Now" section which includes a "quick escape" browsing option. 

17

Equipment Loan Fund for the Disabled

This brochure explains the various components of the NYS Office of Children and Family Services (OCFS) Equipment Loan Fund where disabled residents of New York State are eligible. Money is loaned either directly to the disabled person or to another person responsible for the individual. 

18

Going to College with Disabilities

Every college has services for disabled students and will work with you to make your experience as stress-free and successful as possible. This website provides steps you should take if you're disabled and planning to go to college.

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Helping Youth Build Work Skills for Job Success: Tips for Parents and Families

This InfoBrief addresses the need for youth to acquire work skills and offers strategies parents and families can use to work with their youth to develop skills that lead to success on the job. This InfoBrief also includes information on how to incorporate work skill development into school documents, such as the Individualized Education Program and the Summary of Performance.

20

Information for Parents of Preschool Students with Disabilities Ages 3-5

The New York State Education Department (SED), Office of Special Education oversees a statewide preschool special education program with school districts, municipalities, approved providers and parents. Evaluations and specially planned individual or group instructional services or programs are provided to eligible children who have a disability that affects their learning. Funding for these special education programs and services is provided by municipalities and the state.

Developed by the Council on Children and Families and Funded by the Developmental Disabilities Planning Council