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Alternative Employment Options

Programs that provide or assist people in obtaining work arrangements that are alternatives to traditional permanent, full-time jobs. Included are positions that involve part time work, contract work, temporary work, day labor, on-call work, seasonal work or jobs that are not expected to last longer than one year.

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Alternative Employment Options

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1

ADA.Gov

The ADA requires the Department of Justice to provide technical assistance to businesses, State and local governments, and individuals with rights or responsibilities under the law. The Department provides education and technical assistance through a variety of means to encourage voluntary compliance. Activities include providing direct technical assistance and guidance to the public through this ADA Website and the ADA Information Line, developing and disseminating technical assistance materials to the public, and undertaking outreach initiatives.

ADA Information Line

The Department of Justice operates a toll-free ADA Information Line to provide information and materials to the public about the requirements of the ADA.  ADA Specialists, who assist callers in understanding how the ADA applies to their situation, are available on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday from 9:30 a.m. until 5:30 p.m. (Eastern Time) and on Thursday from 12:30 p.m. until 5:30 p.m. (Eastern Time). Calls are confidential. To get answers to technical questions, obtain general ADA information, order free ADA materials, or ask about filing a complaint, please call: 800-514-0301 (voice); 800-514-0383 (TTY)

ADA Technical Assistance Materials

Copies of the Department's ADA regulations, technical assistance publications, and some videos can be obtained on this website, by calling the ADA Information Line, or writing to the address listed below. Publications are available in standard print and alternate format. Some publications are available in foreign languages.

U.S. Department of Justice
Civil Rights Division
950 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W.
Disability Rights Section - NYAV
Washington, D.C. 20530

2

Adult Career and Continuing Education Services - Vocational Rehabilitation (ACCES-VR)

Adult Career and Continuing Education Services-Vocational Rehabilitation (ACCES-VR) starts with the presumption that all individuals with disabilities can benefit from vocational rehabilitation services and should have opportunities to work in jobs integrated within their communities. Vocational rehabilitation counselors guide individuals through service programs they need to reach their employment goal.

Adult Career and Continuing Education Services - Vocational Rehabilitation (ACCES-VR) offers access to a full range of employment and independent living services that may be needed by persons with disabilities throughout their lives.

It's important to note that a special education classification is not necessary to receive vocational assistance from ACCES-VR. An individual must have a disability that interferes with getting or keeping a job; be able to benefit from vocational rehabilitation services; need VR services to get, keep or advance at a job

This resource includes links to many informative brochures and web pages.

3

Become an Apprentice

This website provides information on how to apply for apprenticeships in New York State. It provides a list of apprenticeship occupations and advice on how to become an apprentice.

4

Disability Resource Clearinghouse and Navigators

The Justice Center’s Disability Resource Clearinghouse provides information about disability-related programs, services, laws and regulations. This Clearinghouse links to resources from local, state, federal and national agencies, as well as nonprofit organizations. 

NEED FURTHER ASSISTANCE?

If you cannot find the information you need, call a Disability Navigator toll-free at 1-800-624-4143.  Relay users, please dial 7-1-1 or email infoassistance@justicecenter.ny.gov.  

5

Disability.Gov

Disability.gov is the federal government website for comprehensive information about disability-related programs, services, policies, laws and regulations. The site links to thousands of resources from many different federal government agencies, as well as state and local governments and nonprofit organizations across the country.

Every day, new resources are added to Disability.gov’s 10 main subject areas: Benefits, Civil Rights, Community Life, Education, Emergency Preparedness, Employment, Health, Housing, Technology and Transportation. You’ll find information on topics such as Social Security disability benefits, job accommodations for employees with disabilities, accessible housing, and organizations in your state that can help you find a job or live independently.

Please keep in mind that Disability.gov is an “information and referral” website, which means almost every time you select a resource, you will go to another website. For example, a resource about Social Security disability benefits may direct you to  Social Security Administration (www.ssa.gov). Disability.gov is not responsible for the maintenance, accuracy or accessibility of information on these websites.

6

Employment - A Guide for Transition Services

Most young people rely on caring adults to support them with guidance, housing and financial assistance, and ongoing emotional connections. Young people from foster care often miss out on these supports traditionally provided by families. They may also have added challenges due to earlier abuse, neglect, and separation. 

It’s My Life: Employment Guide offers specific strategies, tactics, and resources for youth and the adults who guide and support these youth to help them gain employment.

7

Foster Club's Transition Toolkit

The FosterClub Transition Toolkit can help foster youth and the adults supporting them develop a comprehensive transition plan. This Transition Toolkit is built around ten different domains (or topics): finances + money management; job + career; life skills; identity; permanence; education; self-care + health; housing; transportation; community; culture and social life. In this Toolkit, each of these domains is shown as a line on a subway map. The “subway” map will give you a look at everything you’ll need to plan for on your way to successful life on your own. The Toolkit also provides with transition planning worksheet templates.

8

New York Arc Chapters

Arc programs continue to be leaders in providing supportive home environments to people with developmental disabilities. Through the Arc, people are able to live in comfortable houses and apartments and are encouraged to become active members of their community. This website provides a directory of all Arc Programs in New York State.

9

NYS Career Center Locator

The NYS Department of Labor (DOL) has career centers located throughout New York State. These centers provide convenient no cost job search services to job-seekers. Services include: career counseling; skills assessment; resume development; career workshops (such as job search strategies, networking, interview skills, etc.); computer and internet access; computer workshops; Adult Basic Education/English as a Second Language; phones, faxes and copiers; career resource library; job search resources and job placement assistance; vocational classroom training for those that qualify; financial aid for training; online Talent Bank; access to qualified service providers; and referrals to other educational, training and social services. The department's career center website has a career center locator tool that uses zip codes to locate a center closest to where you live.

Many career centers have disability resource coordinators. Contact information for all career centers and disability resource coordinators are available in our mapping tool. 

10

NYS Commission for the Blind and Visually Handicapped

The mission of the NYS Commission for the Blind and Visually Handicapped (CBVH) is to enhance employability, to maximize independence, and to assist in the development of the capacities and strengths of people who are legally blind. CBVH provides vocational rehabilitation and other direct services to legally blind New York State residents, including children, adults, and elderly persons.

One of CBVH's primary objectives is to assist consumers in achieving economic self-sufficiency and full integration into society. CBVH offers these services from seven district offices across the state. CBVH works closely with not-for-profit agencies for the blind throughout New York State to provide technical, educational and resource assistance to our consumers.

Developed by the Council on Children and Families and Funded by the Developmental Disabilities Planning Council