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Employment

Employment for persons with disabilities often requires assistance to people who are able and willing to work by helping them prepare for, find, secure and retain suitable employment; provide work site evaluation and/or modification support; and/or seek to develop employment opportunities in various fields for people who need a position.

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Employment

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1

A-Z of Disabilities and Accommodations

The Job Accommodation Network (JAN) provides free consulting services for individuals with physical or intellectual limitations that affect employment. Services include one-on-one consultation about job accommodation ideas, requesting and negotiating accommodations, and rights under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and related laws. Although JAN does not help individuals find employment, JAN does provide information for job seekers.

JAN provides information on: various disabilities, impairments, and conditions; accommodations and other ADA issues; and accommodation ideas by physical limitations.

2

ACCESS NYC

Find help in NYC with food, money, housing, work and more on ACCESS NYC. There are over 30 programs you or your family may be eligible for regardless of immigration status and even if you’re already receiving benefits or have a job.

3

Accessing Home and Community-Based Services: A Guide for Self-Advocates

Accessing Home and Community-Based Services: A Guide for Self Advocates is a tool designed to help people with disabilities, families, and friends find and use available resources. This may include family and friends, community-based services, state funded waivers and programs, and other resources to help empower people with disabilities to live as independently as possible and make our own choices about what we need. It is a tool to inform about various resources and how to access them. It is also a reference about resources that, although you may not need or want them now, you can use in the future.

4

ADA.Gov

The ADA requires the Department of Justice to provide technical assistance to businesses, State and local governments, and individuals with rights or responsibilities under the law. The Department provides education and technical assistance through a variety of means to encourage voluntary compliance. Activities include providing direct technical assistance and guidance to the public through this ADA Website and the ADA Information Line, developing and disseminating technical assistance materials to the public, and undertaking outreach initiatives.

ADA Information Line

The Department of Justice operates a toll-free ADA Information Line to provide information and materials to the public about the requirements of the ADA.  ADA Specialists, who assist callers in understanding how the ADA applies to their situation, are available on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday from 9:30 a.m. until 5:30 p.m. (Eastern Time) and on Thursday from 12:30 p.m. until 5:30 p.m. (Eastern Time). Calls are confidential. To get answers to technical questions, obtain general ADA information, order free ADA materials, or ask about filing a complaint, please call: 800-514-0301 (voice); 800-514-0383 (TTY)

ADA Technical Assistance Materials

Copies of the Department's ADA regulations, technical assistance publications, and some videos can be obtained on this website, by calling the ADA Information Line, or writing to the address listed below. Publications are available in standard print and alternate format. Some publications are available in foreign languages.

U.S. Department of Justice
Civil Rights Division
950 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W.
Disability Rights Section - NYAV
Washington, D.C. 20530

5

Adult Career and Continuing Education Services - Vocational Rehabilitation (ACCES-VR)

Adult Career and Continuing Education Services-Vocational Rehabilitation (ACCES-VR) starts with the presumption that all individuals with disabilities can benefit from vocational rehabilitation services and should have opportunities to work in jobs integrated within their communities. Vocational rehabilitation counselors guide individuals through service programs they need to reach their employment goal.

Adult Career and Continuing Education Services - Vocational Rehabilitation (ACCES-VR) offers access to a full range of employment and independent living services that may be needed by persons with disabilities throughout their lives.

It's important to note that a special education classification is not necessary to receive vocational assistance from ACCES-VR. An individual must have a disability that interferes with getting or keeping a job; be able to benefit from vocational rehabilitation services; need VR services to get, keep or advance at a job

This resource includes links to many informative brochures and web pages.

6

Become an Apprentice

This website provides information on how to apply for apprenticeships in New York State. It provides a list of apprenticeship occupations and advice on how to become an apprentice.

7

Casey Life Sills (CLS) Assessment Tool

The Casey Life Skills (CLS) tool is a tool for youth to build their own personal checklist of skills and strengths. It shows them what they know already and what is possible for them to learn in the future. A case worker or mentor needs to help them create a free account.

8

Disability Resource Clearinghouse and Navigators

The Justice Center’s Disability Resource Clearinghouse provides information about disability-related programs, services, laws and regulations. This Clearinghouse links to resources from local, state, federal and national agencies, as well as nonprofit organizations. 

NEED FURTHER ASSISTANCE?

If you cannot find the information you need, call a Disability Navigator toll-free at 1-800-624-4143.  Relay users, please dial 7-1-1 or email infoassistance@justicecenter.ny.gov.  

9

Disability Rights NY Hotlines & Resources

All requests for assistance are processed by DRNY's Intake Office. The vast majority of requests for assistance are received and processed by telephone or TTY. The intake office is available to conduct telephone or in-person intake interviews Monday through Friday between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m, and includes Spanish speaking staff.

10

Disability Scholarships

Passed in 1990, the Americans with Disabilities Act has required schools to accommodate the needs of their disabled students, breaking down many barriers that prevented students from accessing educational resources, and enabling more people to enjoy the full benefits of a college education. Recruitment efforts and financial aid opportunities aimed at disabled students now exist at a number of schools. Additionally, many private organizations award scholarship money to ensure that students with disabilities are able to achieve their college goals, despite potential setbacks such as learning issues, environmental challenges, or medical conflicts.

Disability scholarships exist to provide college funding for students who possess numerous cognitive, behavioral, and emotional impediments that would make it difficult to attain a college degree. These scholarship opportunities help deserving students stay in school and out of debt, allowing them to more easily achieve their educational and career goals.

Disability scholarships are funded by a variety of scholarship providers with different requirements. They can be intended to help students with a specific disability pay for school, or they can be aimed at a wider range of students who have physical or mental issues. Disability scholarship providers may choose to narrow their awards towards students who have completed a specific program or who will attend a particular college or university. Some scholarship awards are aimed at groups that face multiple barriers to education; such as low-income, minority, or females with disabilities. Certain local scholarships might also be earmarked for disabled students.

Developed by the Council on Children and Families and Funded by the Developmental Disabilities Planning Council