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Accessibility

Information about the accessibility of parks, airports, public buildings and other facilities for use by people who have restricted mobility.

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Accessibility

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1

10 Steps to More Accessible Presentations

Designing accessible slideshows is easy, because often it’s what you leave out that makes your presentation more accessible. This presentation looks at 10 basic rules which will help you design better presentation.

2

2-1-1/3-1-1

2-1-1 (and 3-1-1 in New York City) are easy-to-remember numbers that helps people cut through what can be a confusing and overwhelming maze of information and resources.

2-1-1 (and 3-1-1 in New York City) helps people assess their needs and links them directly to the resources that will help. Whether you are looking for essential services, seeking volunteer opportunities or starting a small business, 2-1-1 (and 3-1-1 in New York City) is there to help.

3

ADA, Section 504 & Postsecondary Education

It is important that students and their advocates become knowledgeable about their rights and responsibilities in postsecondary education. Although protections exist, the students have considerably more responsibility in postsecondary education to request their own accommodations. This responsibility is ongoing. For many students with disabilities, good self-advocacy skills are the key to success, and knowing their rights is one essential element of effective self-advocacy.

4

Adult Career and Continuing Education Services - Vocational Rehabilitation (ACCES-VR)

Adult Career and Continuing Education Services-Vocational Rehabilitation (ACCES-VR) starts with the presumption that all individuals with disabilities can benefit from vocational rehabilitation services and should have opportunities to work in jobs integrated within their communities. Vocational rehabilitation counselors guide individuals through service programs they need to reach their employment goal.

Adult Career and Continuing Education Services - Vocational Rehabilitation (ACCES-VR) offers access to a full range of employment and independent living services that may be needed by persons with disabilities throughout their lives.

It's important to note that a special education classification is not necessary to receive vocational assistance from ACCES-VR. An individual must have a disability that interferes with getting or keeping a job; be able to benefit from vocational rehabilitation services; need VR services to get, keep or advance at a job

This resource includes links to many informative brochures and web pages.

5

Adult Career and Continuing Education Services - Vocational Rehabilitation (ACCES-VR) District Offices

Adult Career and Continuing Education Services-Vocational Rehabilitation (ACCES-VR) starts with the presumption that all individuals with disabilities can benefit from vocational rehabilitation services and should have opportunities to work in jobs integrated within their communities. Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors guide individuals through service programs they need to reach their employment goal.

Adult Career and Continuing Education Services - Vocational Rehabilitation (ACCES-VR) offers access to a full range of employment and independent living services that may be needed by persons with disabilities throughout their lives.

Use this interactive map to locate the ACCES-VR office in your county.

6

Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs (CYSHCN) Program

Children with special health care needs have an illness or condition for which they need extra health care and support services. These children might have a serious or long lasting: 

  • Physical condition;
  • Intellectual or development disability, and/or
  • Behavioral or emotional condition.

7

College-level Reading - Tips and Tools to Help with Comprehension and Fluency

This is a guide for parents and students and provides a quick overview of tools and strategies to aid comprehension and fluency while reading college level text.

8

College: You Can Do It! Tip Sheet

This tip sheet provides helpful information to help students with disabilities prepare for college.

The document covers three phases: 

  • Preparing for college while in high school.
  • Staying in college, which requires numerous self-management skills.
  • Preparing to move beyond college and into a career.

9

Independent Living Programs

Centers for Independent Living (CIL) are community-based, cross-disability, non-profit organizations that are designed and operated by people with disabilities. CILs are unique in that they operate according to a strict philosophy of consumer control, wherein people with all types of disabilities directly govern and staff the organization. Centers for Independent Living Provide:

  • Peer Support
  • Information and Referral
  • Individual and Systems Advocacy
  • Independent Living Skills Training

Locate Centers for Independent Living (CIL) using our mapping tool.

10

Medicaid Health Homes

A "Health Home" is not a physical place; it is a group of health care and service providers working together to make sure you get the care and services you need to stay healthy. Once you are enrolled in a Health Home, you will have a care manager that works with you to develop a care plan. A care plan maps out the services you need, to put you on the road to better health. Some of the services may include:

  • Connecting to health care providers,
  • Connecting to mental health and substance abuse providers,
  • Connecting to needed medications,
  • Help with housing,
  • Social services (such as food, benefits, and transportation) or,
  • Other community programs that can support and assist you.

Developed by the Council on Children and Families and Funded by the Developmental Disabilities Planning Council