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Self-Directed Care

Self-directed care services, often referred to as consumer-directed services, is a philosophy and practice that assumes that caregivers have the right and ability to assess their own needs, determine how and by whom those needs are met, and evaluate the quality of the services they receive.

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Self-Directed Care

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1

2-1-1/3-1-1

2-1-1 (and 3-1-1 in New York City) are easy-to-remember numbers that helps people cut through what can be a confusing and overwhelming maze of information and resources.

2-1-1 (and 3-1-1 in New York City) helps people assess their needs and links them directly to the resources that will help. Whether you are looking for essential services, seeking volunteer opportunities or starting a small business, 2-1-1 (and 3-1-1 in New York City) is there to help.

2

Community, Work and Independence, Inc.

Community, Work & Independence, Inc (CWI), headquartered in Glens Falls, NY, offers a diverse array of services for individuals with disabilities in Warren, Washington, Saratoga and Essex Counties.  Services include:  Residential, Day Habilitation, Community Supports, Pre-vcational and Employment Services, Clinical Services and Consumer Directed Personal Assistance Program. Funding sources include OPWDD, OMH, ACCES-VR and DOH.

3

Developmental Disabilities Regional Offices (DDROs)

Developmental Disabilities Regional Offices (DDROs) are the starting point to apply for services. With an eye to enhanced oversight and quality improvement, the Office for People With Developmental Disabilities (OPWDD) has established regions (“catchment areas”) that allow for better coordination of services with the State Office of Mental Health, State Department of Health and other agencies with whom we often partner in providing services.

In order to assist individuals and families to make informed choices about the supports and services best suited to their needs, DDROs work with local voluntary provider agencies to improve access to and coordinate services within a region (“catchment area”).

DDROs are responsible for the following activities:

  • eligibility;
  • intake;
  • waiver enrollment (a Federal-State partnership which makes certain types of services available within the home or community so as to avoid placement in an institution);
  • local management of Individual and Community Supports (ICS);
  • management of resources for crisis intervention;
  • advocacy;
  • shared management of OPWDD statewide applications;
  • service recruitment and development for the Family Care  program; and
  • programs, services and supports for aging individuals with developmental disabilities.

Eligibility for services is determined by the Developmental Disabilities Regional Offices (DDROs).  Please contact the Eligibility Coordinator of the Regional Office representing the county in which the individual/family lives.

Lastly, DDROs act in a supporting role to DD State Operations Offices with regard to eligibility for others areas of statewide services including but not limited to: level of care determinations; clinical delivery and waiver service delivery; Article 16 clinics; quality improvement processes; review of audit reports for trend analysis; emergency preparedness; safety, security and maintenance; and implementation of OPWDD initiatives.

View DDROs using our MSNavigator Mapping Tool.

4

Developmental Disability State Operations Offices (DDSOOs)

Developmental Disabilities State Operations Offices (DDSOOs) administer and oversee state operations for the Office for People With Developmental Disabilities (OPWDD), including the direct delivery of services and supports to people with developmental disabilities by state staff.  By focusing on local supports and services, statewide quality and consistency, and enhanced networking to promote best practices, DDSOOs are able to provide a consistent approach and culture, so that individuals and their families can expect continuous quality improvement in all services delivered directly by OPWDD across the state.

DDSOOs are responsible for the following activities:

  • development and monitoring of OPWDD systems improvement (e.g., continuous quality improvement processes, plans of corrective action (POCAs), informed consent and Behavior Management Committees);
  • offering specialized supports/services and service delivery in the areas of clinical and food services, waiver services and volunteers/senior companions;
  • acting in the capacity of advocate when responding to stakeholder questions and legislative inquiries;
  • oversight of support services (e.g., Medicaid compliance, HIPAA compliance and clinical records review);
  • oversight of the Statewide Technical Assistance Team, which provides pre-survey and focused technical assistance activities to campus-based ICFs and other state-operated community-based residential programs in which quality improvement issues have been identified; and ensures ongoing compliance with federal requirements and  that program certification is maintained;
  • management, on the local level, a variety of OPWDD statewide electronic billing and recordkeeping systems
  • oversight of the day-to-day administration of State-operated Family Care; and
  • oversight and coordination of fire safety initiatives, including development of evacuation plans in state-operated programs, and establishing and maintaining working relationships with local fire departments.

Eligibility for services is determined by the Developmental Disabilities Regional Offices (DDROs). Please contact the Eligibility Coordinator of the Regional Office representing the county in which the individual/family lives.

Lastly, DDSOOs act in a supporting role to DD Regional Offices in the areas of service development, local management of individual and community supports and crisis intervention.

View DDSOOs using our MSNavigator Mapping Tool. 

5

Disability Rights NY Hotlines & Resources

All requests for assistance are processed by DRNY's Intake Office. The vast majority of requests for assistance are received and processed by telephone or TTY. The intake office is available to conduct telephone or in-person intake interviews Monday through Friday between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m, and includes Spanish speaking staff.

6

Independent Living Programs

Centers for Independent Living (CIL) are community-based, cross-disability, non-profit organizations that are designed and operated by people with disabilities. CILs are unique in that they operate according to a strict philosophy of consumer control, wherein people with all types of disabilities directly govern and staff the organization. Centers for Independent Living Provide:

  • Peer Support
  • Information and Referral
  • Individual and Systems Advocacy
  • Independent Living Skills Training

Locate Centers for Independent Living (CIL) using our mapping tool.

7

Mental Health Program Directory

The Mental Health Program Directory is a searchable list of programs that are licensed by the NYS Office of Mental Health (OMH) and programs that are funded by OMH that do not need a license to operate. Users can:

  • Search for mental health programs by county, program category or subcategory.
  • View program details such as program name, address and phone number.
  • Click on any county on the map to view all of the programs in that county
  • View program definitions

Types of searchable programs and services included in the directory: psychiatric emergency programs; crisis intervention services; inpatient and outpatient treatment options; supports, including respite services; and vocational services. 

8

NY Connects

NY Connects provides information and assistance related to long-term services and supports in New York State for people of all ages or with any type of disability. NY Connects uses a searchable directory for programs, providers, and services in your area.

NY Connects staff can help link you to long-term services and supports, such as home care, transportation and meals. The goal is to help individuals live as independently as possible while meeting their medical, social and functional needs that arise from aging or disability. This program helps individuals, families, caregivers, and professionals.

Contact your local office to:

  • Get information by phone, online, or in person.
  • Connect to long-term services and supports regardless of diagnosis, age or how you will pay for services.
  • Receive guidance and coordination as you go through assessment and eligibility processes.
  • Help with completing applications and enrollment in public assistance benefits, such as Medicaid.
  • Or for any additional information.

9

NYS Commission for the Blind and Visually Handicapped

The mission of the NYS Commission for the Blind and Visually Handicapped (CBVH) is to enhance employability, to maximize independence, and to assist in the development of the capacities and strengths of people who are legally blind. CBVH provides vocational rehabilitation and other direct services to legally blind New York State residents, including children, adults, and elderly persons.

One of CBVH's primary objectives is to assist consumers in achieving economic self-sufficiency and full integration into society. CBVH offers these services from seven district offices across the state. CBVH works closely with not-for-profit agencies for the blind throughout New York State to provide technical, educational and resource assistance to our consumers.

10

NYS Special Education Quality Assurance (SEQA) Program

Regional associates at the Quality Assurance office located in your school district will answer questions about special education. Within each office, Regional Associates, who are employees of the State Education Department, are assigned to specific school districts and special education programs. The Regional Associate oversees preschool and school-age special education services, and serve as a resource to parents, school district personnel and private providers. Responsibilities include:

  • Conduct Quality Assurance Reviews of public and private special education programs. The purpose of the review is to determine compliance with federal and State special education laws and regulations. Areas of strength and weakness in regard to effective evaluation and instructional practices are identified as part of the review process. The goal of the review is to make programs more effective and to positively affect student results.
  • Provide technical assistance to parents, school district personnel, and special education programs.
  • Provide general information regarding services for students with disabilities to parents, school district personnel, private providers, and other stakeholders.
  • Oversee certain grant applications for the expenditure of federal IDEA  funds.
  • Investigate complaints alleging a public or private special education program's noncompliance with federal or state law or regulation pertaining to the education of students with disabilities.

Listed below are the Special Education Quality Assurance Regional Office numbers. When contacting the regional office, please identify your county, school district or special education program so that you may be directed to the appropriate Regional Associate.

Developed by the Council on Children and Families and Funded by the Developmental Disabilities Planning Council