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Out-of-Home/Residential Care

Out-of-Home/Residential Care provides a therapeutic living environment in community-based facilities for individuals who have emotional and/or behavioral problems and require a structured, supervised treatment program which may include individual, group, family and other treatment modalities as appropriate, but who do not require inpatient psychiatric hospitalization.

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Out-of-Home/Residential Care

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1

Community, Work and Independence, Inc.

Community, Work & Independence, Inc (CWI), headquartered in Glens Falls, NY, offers a diverse array of services for individuals with disabilities in Warren, Washington, Saratoga and Essex Counties.  Services include:  Residential, Day Habilitation, Community Supports, Pre-vcational and Employment Services, Clinical Services and Consumer Directed Personal Assistance Program. Funding sources include OPWDD, OMH, ACCES-VR and DOH.

2

Developmental Disabilities Regional Offices (DDROs)

Developmental Disabilities Regional Offices (DDROs) are the starting point to apply for services. With an eye to enhanced oversight and quality improvement, the Office for People With Developmental Disabilities (OPWDD) has established regions (“catchment areas”) that allow for better coordination of services with the State Office of Mental Health, State Department of Health and other agencies with whom we often partner in providing services.

In order to assist individuals and families to make informed choices about the supports and services best suited to their needs, DDROs work with local voluntary provider agencies to improve access to and coordinate services within a region (“catchment area”).

DDROs are responsible for the following activities:

  • eligibility;
  • intake;
  • waiver enrollment (a Federal-State partnership which makes certain types of services available within the home or community so as to avoid placement in an institution);
  • local management of Individual and Community Supports (ICS);
  • management of resources for crisis intervention;
  • advocacy;
  • shared management of OPWDD statewide applications;
  • service recruitment and development for the Family Care  program; and
  • programs, services and supports for aging individuals with developmental disabilities.

Eligibility for services is determined by the Developmental Disabilities Regional Offices (DDROs).  Please contact the Eligibility Coordinator of the Regional Office representing the county in which the individual/family lives.

Lastly, DDROs act in a supporting role to DD State Operations Offices with regard to eligibility for others areas of statewide services including but not limited to: level of care determinations; clinical delivery and waiver service delivery; Article 16 clinics; quality improvement processes; review of audit reports for trend analysis; emergency preparedness; safety, security and maintenance; and implementation of OPWDD initiatives.

View DDROs using our MSNavigator Mapping Tool.

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Interagency Case Resolution Unit

The Interagency Case Resolution Unit works to assist caregivers and individuals in receiving the most appropriate community-based or residential services; minimize delays in arranging services or placements, and resolves barriers that impede timely service delivery or placement. 

The Interagency Case Resolution Unit becomes involved ONLY after all program options and dispute resolution procedures have been exhausted at the local and regional levels, or if a caregiver feels their child's needs are not being met by existing systems. 

How to Make a Referral

The agent making a referral on behalf of a child must provide the Council with the following:

  • a completed Intake Form and a signed Release of Information Form;
  • a description of the barriers encountered in attempting to provide appropriate services or placement;
  • a record of the efforts that have been made by the referral source or others to secure services and/or placements for the child; and
  • background information on the child's special needs.

A referral containing all of the information mentioned above may be submitted to:

Sheila Jackson, Coordinator, Interagency Case Resolution Unit 

Kathleen Rivers, Assistant Coordinator, Interagency Case Resolution Unit

Interagency Case Resolution Unit
NYS Council on Children and Families
52 Washington Street
West Building, Suite 99
Rensselaer, NY 12144

Telephone: 518-473-3652
Fax: 518-473-2570
e-mail: sheila.jackson@ccf.ny.gov; kathleen.rivers@ccf.ny.gov

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Mental Health Program Directory

The Mental Health Program Directory is a searchable list of programs that are licensed by the NYS Office of Mental Health (OMH) and programs that are funded by OMH that do not need a license to operate. Users can:

  • Search for mental health programs by county, program category or subcategory.
  • View program details such as program name, address and phone number.
  • Click on any county on the map to view all of the programs in that county
  • View program definitions

Types of searchable programs and services included in the directory: psychiatric emergency programs; crisis intervention services; inpatient and outpatient treatment options; supports, including respite services; and vocational services. 

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Schools for Children/Youth with Disabilities

Schools for Children/Youth with Disabilities include, 853 schools, state-operated schools, special act school districts, and state-supported (4201) schools. These special education schools believe that all students have the capacity to learn in a manner that fosters self-esteem, connects them to a supportive school community and fosters an optimistic worldview. These schools work with children and youth who struggle with internal and external factors beyond their control that have contributed to a failure to thrive in school. These schools strive to create an environment that cultivates interpersonal relationships, maintains structure and provides opportunities to build competence.

View Chapter 853/Union-Free/Special Act Schools using the MS Navigator mapping tool.

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Single Point of Access (SPOA)

Single Point of Access (SPOA) is part of the NYS Office of Mental Health's (OMH) 2000-2001 initiatives designed to expand the county's existing community based mental health system and help make it a more cohesive and better coordinated system. The goal is to create a system that promotes recovery-oriented services, which are widely available, flexible, personally tailored and responsive to individual needs. Individual's preferences will be integrated into the process. All referrals and transitions between programs and services will be entered into a database, in order to monitor who receives services, who does not, alternative recommendations, and the actual mental health residential and case management needs. There will be periodic reassessment and monitoring of an individual's need for a particular level of care/service.

SPOA Coordinators connect people with serious mental illness to mental health services.

Developed by the Council on Children and Families and Funded by the Developmental Disabilities Planning Council