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Alternative Schools/Trade Schools/BOCES

Schools that offer the basic elementary or secondary curriculum plus creative electives in an informal instructional setting which features an approach to teaching and learning which emphasizes the students' right to make decisions and that views the teacher as a facilitator of learning rather than as a transmitter of knowledge. 

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Alternative Schools/Trade Schools/BOCES

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1

Interagency Case Resolution Unit

The Interagency Case Resolution Unit works to assist caregivers and individuals in receiving the most appropriate community-based or residential services; minimize delays in arranging services or placements, and resolves barriers that impede timely service delivery or placement. 

The Interagency Case Resolution Unit becomes involved ONLY after all program options and dispute resolution procedures have been exhausted at the local and regional levels, or if a caregiver feels their child's needs are not being met by existing systems. 

How to Make a Referral

The agent making a referral on behalf of a child must provide the Council with the following:

  • a completed Intake Form and a signed Release of Information Form;
  • a description of the barriers encountered in attempting to provide appropriate services or placement;
  • a record of the efforts that have been made by the referral source or others to secure services and/or placements for the child; and
  • background information on the child's special needs.

A referral containing all of the information mentioned above may be submitted to:

Sheila Jackson, Coordinator, Interagency Case Resolution Unit 

Kathleen Rivers, Assistant Coordinator, Interagency Case Resolution Unit

Interagency Case Resolution Unit
NYS Council on Children and Families
52 Washington Street
West Building, Suite 99
Rensselaer, NY 12144

Telephone: 518-473-3652
Fax: 518-473-2570
e-mail: sheila.jackson@ccf.ny.gov; kathleen.rivers@ccf.ny.gov

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New York Systems Change and Inclusive Opportunities Network (NY SCION)

On October 21, 2021, New York State (NYS) Governor Kathy Hochul announced a commitment of $11.1 million in federal workforce development funding over the next three years to expand the already successful network of Disability Resource Coordinators (DRCs) to all 33 Local Workforce Development Areas (LWDAs) to increase the capacity of their service delivery and better serve individuals with disabilities.

This initiative is being referred to as the New York Systems Change and Inclusive Opportunities Network (NY SCION).  The word “scion” is often used in gardening, and it refers to a process by which new plants are grown from old ones.  Similarly, NY SCION builds upon the work of four rounds of federal Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) pilot funding and the Disability Program Navigator before it.  These two initiatives sought to improve education, training, and employment opportunities and outcomes for youth and adults with disabilities including those receiving Social Security disability benefits. NY SCION will do the same – only taken to scale in nearly every LWDA across NYS.

 

3

NYS Special Education Quality Assurance (SEQA) Program

Regional associates at the Quality Assurance office located in your school district will answer questions about special education. Within each office, Regional Associates, who are employees of the State Education Department, are assigned to specific school districts and special education programs. The Regional Associate oversees preschool and school-age special education services and serves as a resource to parents, school district personnel, and private providers. Responsibilities include:

  • Conduct Quality Assurance Reviews of public and private special education programs. The purpose of the review is to determine compliance with federal and State special education laws and regulations. Areas of strength and weakness in regard to effective evaluation and instructional practices are identified as part of the review process. The goal of the review is to make programs more effective and to positively affect student results.
  • Provide technical assistance to parents, school district personnel, and special education programs.
  • Provide general information regarding services for students with disabilities to parents, school district personnel, private providers, and other stakeholders.
  • Oversee certain grant applications for the expenditure of federal IDEA  funds.
  • Investigate complaints alleging a public or private special education program's noncompliance with federal or state law or regulation pertaining to the education of students with disabilities.

The Special Education Quality Assurance Regional Offices. When contacting the regional office, please identify your county, school district, or special education program so that you may be directed to the appropriate Regional Associate.

 

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Schools for Children/Youth with Disabilities

Schools for Children/Youth with Disabilities include, 853 schools, state-operated schools, special act school districts, and state-supported (4201) schools. These special education schools believe that all students have the capacity to learn in a manner that fosters self-esteem, connects them to a supportive school community and fosters an optimistic worldview. These schools work with children and youth who struggle with internal and external factors beyond their control that have contributed to a failure to thrive in school. These schools strive to create an environment that cultivates interpersonal relationships, maintains structure and provides opportunities to build competence.

View Chapter 853/Union-Free/Special Act Schools using the MS Navigator mapping tool.

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The Shield Institute School Age Program

The School Age Program at The Shield Institute provides special education classrooms and related services for students ages 5-21. Their classrooms are highly individualized and provide structured teaching, augmentative communication, aided language and the use of technology according to the New York State Alternative Learning Standards.

Developed by the Council on Children and Families and Funded by the Developmental Disabilities Planning Council