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1

29-I Health Facility (Voluntary Foster Care Agency Transition)

Voluntary Foster Care Agencies (VFCAs) must be licensed for the provision of limited health-related services to contract and bill Medicaid Managed Care Plans and comply with Corporate Practice of Medicine standards. To be licensed as a VFCA Health Facility, the foster care agency must apply to the NYS Office of Children and Family Services and the NYS Department of Health and include limited health-related services to be provided, the location and physical description of the physical plant, and other required information.

2

ACCESS NYC

Find help in NYC with food, money, housing, work and more on ACCESS NYC. There are over 30 programs you or your family may be eligible for regardless of immigration status and even if you’re already receiving benefits or have a job.

3

Accessing Home and Community-Based Services: A Guide for Self-Advocates

Accessing Home and Community-Based Services: A Guide for Self Advocates is a tool designed to help people with disabilities, families, and friends find and use available resources. This may include family and friends, community-based services, state funded waivers and programs, and other resources to help empower people with disabilities to live as independently as possible and make our own choices about what we need. It is a tool to inform about various resources and how to access them. It is also a reference about resources that, although you may not need or want them now, you can use in the future.

4

Benefit Development Resource Guide

The Benefit Development Resource Guide (Resource Guide) is designed to assist employees who are responsible for developing the benefits and entitlements necessary to fund services for individuals served by OPWDD and voluntary provider agencies. It is not intended to be read from cover to cover, though those new to the topics discussed may wish to do so. The Resource Guide is primarily intended to be used as a reference during the process of assisting individuals in developing the benefits necessary to fund their care.

This guide provides detailed information about conducting eligibility investigations, protecting assets, and applying for Medicaid, the OPWDD Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Waiver, Supplemental Security Income (SSI), Social Security benefits (SSDI), Medicare, and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP – formerly called Food Stamps). The manual consists of this introduction and the following sections:

  • Benefit Development
  • Liability for Services
  • Medicaid
  • Home and Community Based Services Waiver
  • Supplemental Security Income
  • Social Security Benefits 
  • Work Incentives 
  • Medicare
  • Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program
  • Resource Management
  • Additional Resources

5

Children and Family Treatment and Support Services

The NYS Office of Mental Health (OMH) designed Children and Family Treatment Support (CFTSS) brochures, fact sheets, posters and FAQs in multiple languages. CFTSS provides mental health and/or substance abuse services in NYS Medicaid for children ages birth to 21. Services can be provided at home, in the community, or wherever children/youth and their families feel comfortable.

6

Children's Home and Community Based Services (CHCBS)

Children's Home and Community Based Services are for children and youth (under age 21) who:

  1. Are enrolled or eligible to enroll in Medicaid - Some children/youth may be eligible for Medicaid if they are eligible for Children’s HCBS. If a child/youth does not have Medicaid and you think they may be eligible for HCBS, call C-YES at 1-833-333-2937
  2. Need extra care at home or in the community to avoid the need for long-term inpatient care
  3. Are in a higher level of care and would be able to stay at home with extra support

The NYS Office of Mental Health created multiple HSBC brochures and Q&A.

7

Developmental Disability State Operations Offices (DDSOOs)

Developmental Disabilities State Operations Offices (DDSOOs) administer and oversee state operations for the Office for People With Developmental Disabilities (OPWDD), including the direct delivery of services and supports to people with developmental disabilities by state staff.  By focusing on local supports and services, statewide quality and consistency, and enhanced networking to promote best practices, DDSOOs are able to provide a consistent approach and culture, so that individuals and their families can expect continuous quality improvement in all services delivered directly by OPWDD across the state.

DDSOOs are responsible for the following activities:

  • development and monitoring of OPWDD systems improvement (e.g., continuous quality improvement processes, plans of corrective action (POCAs), informed consent and Behavior Management Committees);
  • offering specialized supports/services and service delivery in the areas of clinical and food services, waiver services and volunteers/senior companions;
  • acting in the capacity of advocate when responding to stakeholder questions and legislative inquiries;
  • oversight of support services (e.g., Medicaid compliance, HIPAA compliance and clinical records review);
  • oversight of the Statewide Technical Assistance Team, which provides pre-survey and focused technical assistance activities to campus-based ICFs and other state-operated community-based residential programs in which quality improvement issues have been identified; and ensures ongoing compliance with federal requirements and  that program certification is maintained;
  • management, on the local level, a variety of OPWDD statewide electronic billing and recordkeeping systems
  • oversight of the day-to-day administration of State-operated Family Care; and
  • oversight and coordination of fire safety initiatives, including development of evacuation plans in state-operated programs, and establishing and maintaining working relationships with local fire departments.

Eligibility for services is determined by the Developmental Disabilities Regional Offices (DDROs). Please contact the Eligibility Coordinator of the Regional Office representing the county in which the individual/family lives.

Lastly, DDSOOs act in a supporting role to DD Regional Offices in the areas of service development, local management of individual and community supports and crisis intervention.

View DDSOOs using our MSNavigator Mapping Tool. 

8

Early Intervention Program

The New York State Early Intervention Program (EIP) is part of the nationwide EIP. It is for infants and toddlers under three years of age who may not be making progress like other children because of a developmental delay or disability. A disability means that a child has a diagnosed physical or mental condition that may lead to developmental problems. These include, but are not limited to, autism, Down syndrome, motor disorders, or vision and hearing problems. A developmental delay means a child is behind in some area of development, such as growth, learning and thinking, or communicating.

The first step is your child's referral to the EIP in the county where you live. All counties in New York State (NYS) and New York City have an EIP. Children who may need services must first be referred to the EIP. Parents can refer their own child to the EIP if they have a concern about their child's development. In NYS, certain professionals are required to refer children to the EIP if a developmental problem is suspected. After referral, your child will be evaluated by qualified professionals. Your county EIP or the New York City EIP will help you get services if your child is found to be eligible. Health insurance, including private insurance and Medicaid, may be used to pay for early intervention services. EIP services must be provided at no cost to you and will not affect your insurance coverage.

View Early Intervention Programs using our MSNavigator Mapping Tool.

 

9

Emergency Resource Guide - DSS

This Emergency Resource Guide provides descriptions of the many services offered by the County Department of Social Services, as well as 24 Hour emergency resource information. Although this guide was developed by Albany County, it contains mostly statewide emergency resource information.

10

History of Systems of Care, Wraparound & Peer Movements in NYS

This video gives a history of systems of care, wraparound and the peer movement in New York State. It provides descriptions and examples of many acronyms used in the mental health field and talks about where we started, where we are now and where we are headed.

Developed by the Council on Children and Families and Funded by the Developmental Disabilities Planning Council