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Keyword: behavioral

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1

Become a Family Peer Advocate (FPA)

Family Peer Advocates are valuable professionals within the child serving system. They are uniquely qualified to work with families based on their first-hand experience as the parent/caregiver of a young person with a social, emotional, behavioral, health, or developmental disability. This experience, combined with additional Parent Empowerment (PEP) training, allows them to provide peer support to parents of children with similar challenges.

2

Behavioral Health Treatment Services Locator Map

The SAMHSA Behavioral Health Treatment Locator Map provides location and contact information for the following issues:

  • Substance Abuse
  • Mental Health
  • Substance Abuse & Mental Health
  • Health Care Centers
  • Veteran's Affairs

This map allows users to filter by location, distance and type of program.

3

Building a School Responder Model

The School Responder Model (SRM) is a response to school infractions that aims to address behavioral health needs and reduce the likelihood of juvenile justice involvement. This interactive web application provides data and practical activities to address behavioral health issues.

4

Child Mind Institute

The Child Mind Institute contains a wide variety of useful information resources for families and educators. The site explores concerns and challenges faced by parents, family members and educators. Learn how to effectively respond to emotional, behavioral and learning challenges. This website also contains many personal story videos.

Th Child Mind Institute is available online or in person (in New York City), offering evaluations, treatment and neuropsychological testing for children, teens and young adults.

5

Children and Family Treatment and Support Services

The NYS Office of Mental Health (OMH) designed Children and Family Treatment Support (CFTSS) brochures, fact sheets, posters and FAQs in multiple languages. CFTSS provides mental health and/or substance abuse services in NYS Medicaid for children ages birth to 21. Services can be provided at home, in the community, or wherever children/youth and their families feel comfortable.

6

Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs (CYSHCN) Program

Children with special health care needs have an illness or condition for which they need extra health care and support services. These children might have a serious or long lasting: 

  • Physical condition;
  • Intellectual or development disability, and/or
  • Behavioral or emotional condition.

7

Children's Home and Community Based Services (CHCBS)

Children's Home and Community Based Services are for children and youth (under age 21) who:

  1. Are enrolled or eligible to enroll in Medicaid - Some children/youth may be eligible for Medicaid if they are eligible for Children’s HCBS. If a child/youth does not have Medicaid and you think they may be eligible for HCBS, call C-YES at 1-833-333-2937
  2. Need extra care at home or in the community to avoid the need for long-term inpatient care
  3. Are in a higher level of care and would be able to stay at home with extra support

The NYS Office of Mental Health created multiple HSBC brochures and Q&A.

8

Collaborative and Proactive Solutions

Whether you're a parent or teacher...whether a child is behaviorally challenging or not...collaboration is the key to improved relationships, better communication, and solving problems. This website contains a ton of free resources to help you move in that direction. The goals of this website is to help to ensure that kids everywhere are treated in ways that are compassionate, informed, and effective.

9

Disability Scholarships

Passed in 1990, the Americans with Disabilities Act has required schools to accommodate the needs of their disabled students, breaking down many barriers that prevented students from accessing educational resources, and enabling more people to enjoy the full benefits of a college education. Recruitment efforts and financial aid opportunities aimed at disabled students now exist at a number of schools. Additionally, many private organizations award scholarship money to ensure that students with disabilities are able to achieve their college goals, despite potential setbacks such as learning issues, environmental challenges, or medical conflicts.

Disability scholarships exist to provide college funding for students who possess numerous cognitive, behavioral, and emotional impediments that would make it difficult to attain a college degree. These scholarship opportunities help deserving students stay in school and out of debt, allowing them to more easily achieve their educational and career goals.

Disability scholarships are funded by a variety of scholarship providers with different requirements. They can be intended to help students with a specific disability pay for school, or they can be aimed at a wider range of students who have physical or mental issues. Disability scholarship providers may choose to narrow their awards towards students who have completed a specific program or who will attend a particular college or university. Some scholarship awards are aimed at groups that face multiple barriers to education; such as low-income, minority, or females with disabilities. Certain local scholarships might also be earmarked for disabled students.

10

Dual Diagnosis - A Guide for Caregivers

This guidebook gives caregivers the tools they need to understand how mental illness might look in a person with a developmental disability, and information on what to do and where to go for help. It was written in order to help caregivers to partner with health care providers. This guidebook was originally written in 2011 and was revised in 2015. It was created for the New York State Institute for Health Transition Training with grant support from the New York State Developmental Disabilities Planning Council.

Developed by the Council on Children and Families and Funded by the Developmental Disabilities Planning Council