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Early Intervention Program

The New York State Early Intervention Program (EIP) is part of the nationwide EIP. It is for infants and toddlers under three years of age who may not be making progress like other children because of a developmental delay or disability. A disability means that a child has a diagnosed physical or mental condition that may lead to developmental problems. These include, but are not limited to, autism, Down syndrome, motor disorders, or vision and hearing problems. A developmental delay means a child is behind in some area of development, such as growth, learning and thinking, or communicating.

The first step is your child's referral to the EIP in the county where you live. All counties in New York State (NYS) and New York City have an EIP. Children who may need services must first be referred to the EIP. Parents can refer their own child to the EIP if they have a concern about their child's development. In NYS, certain professionals are required to refer children to the EIP if a developmental problem is suspected. After referral, your child will be evaluated by qualified professionals. Your county EIP or the New York City EIP will help you get services if your child is found to be eligible. Health insurance, including private insurance and Medicaid, may be used to pay for early intervention services. EIP services must be provided at no cost to you and will not affect your insurance coverage.

View Early Intervention Programs using our MSNavigator Mapping Tool.

 

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Interagency Coordination and Case Resolution Bureau

The Hard to Place/Hard to Serve Unit works to assist caregivers and individuals in receiving the most appropriate community-based or residential services; minimize delays in arranging services or placements; and resolves barriers that impede timely service delivery or placement. 

The Hard to Place/Hard to Serve Unit becomes involved ONLY after all program options and dispute resolution procedures have been exhausted at the local and regional levels, or if a caregiver feels their child's needs are not being met by existing systems. 

How to Make a Referral

The agent making a referral on behalf of a child must provide the Council with the following:

  • a completed Hard to Place Unit Intake Form and a signed Release of Information Form;
  • a description of the barriers encountered in attempting to provide appropriate services or placement;
  • a record of the efforts that have been made by the referral source or others to secure services and/or placements for the child; and
  • background information on the child's special needs.

A referral containing all of the information mentioned above may be submitted to:

Sheila Jackson, Coordinator, Hard-to-Place/Hard-to-Serve Unit 

Kathleen Rivers, Assistant Coordinator, Hard-to-Place/Hard-to-Serve Unit

Interagency Coordination and Case Resolution Bureau
NYS Council on Children and Families
52 Washington Street
West Building, Suite 99
Rensselaer, NY 12144

Telephone: 518-473-3652
Fax: 518-473-2570
e-mail: sheila.jackson@ccf.ny.gov; kathleen.rivers@ccf.ny.gov

Developed by the Council on Children and Families and Funded by the Developmental Disabilities Planning Council