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1

29-I Health Facility (Voluntary Foster Care Agency Transition)

Voluntary Foster Care Agencies (VFCAs) must be licensed for the provision of limited health-related services to contract and bill Medicaid Managed Care Plans and comply with Corporate Practice of Medicine standards. To be licensed as a VFCA Health Facility, the foster care agency must apply to the NYS Office of Children and Family Services and the NYS Department of Health and include limited health-related services to be provided, the location and physical description of the physical plant, and other required information.

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ABLE Accounts: 10 Things You Should Know

ABLE Accounts are tax-advantaged savings accounts for individuals with disabilities and their families. The beneficiary of the account is the account owner, and income earned by the accounts will not be taxed. Contributions to the account made by any person (the account beneficiary, family and friends) will be made using post-taxed dollars and will not be tax deductible, although some states may allow for state income tax deductions for contribution made to an ABLE account.

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About Family Court - Need to Know Series

Youth living in foster care have their cases heard in Family Court, a court which deals with issues of families, children, and youth. You, like many others, may have questions about Family Court, what to expect there, how to present yourself effectively and what the terms used there mean. This pamphlet was designed to help you understand Family Court. After you’ve read this pamphlet, you can talk to your caseworker or attorney regarding any questions you may have.

 

4

ACCESS NYC

Find help in NYC with food, money, housing, work and more on ACCESS NYC. There are over 30 programs you or your family may be eligible for regardless of immigration status and even if you’re already receiving benefits or have a job.

5

Accessing Home and Community-Based Services: A Guide for Self-Advocates

Accessing Home and Community-Based Services: A Guide for Self Advocates is a tool designed to help people with disabilities, families, and friends find and use available resources. This may include family and friends, community-based services, state funded waivers and programs, and other resources to help empower people with disabilities to live as independently as possible and make our own choices about what we need. It is a tool to inform about various resources and how to access them. It is also a reference about resources that, although you may not need or want them now, you can use in the future.

6

ACR Health Hotline

Provides various support groups for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Questioning youth ages 13-25 and Transyouth ages 5-25 as well as Family Support will a Credentialed Family Peer Advocate for Families of Transyouth.

7

Arc Fact Sheets

The Arc has compiled a series of brief, two-page fact sheets for family members, advocates, professionals, media, researchers, policymakers and others that provide an overview of a specific topic related to intellectual disability. A wide variety of topics are covered, from the causes of intellectual disability to various types of syndromes to criminal justice/victimization issues.

8

Assertive Community Treatment (ACT)

Youth Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) is a program designed to address the significant needs of children ages 10 up to 21, who are at risk of entering, or returning home from high intensity services, such as inpatient settings or residential services, through the use of a multi-disciplinary team. Children with significant psychiatric needs, who are at risk of institutional level of care, require intensive interventions in order to adequately support the child and family’s complex needs, to avoid high end services or facilitate and support a successful transition back to community. Youth ACT serves as a critical component in the children’s continuum of care.

9

Become a Family Peer Advocate (FPA)

Family Peer Advocates are valuable professionals within the child serving system. They are uniquely qualified to work with families based on their first-hand experience as the parent/caregiver of a young person with a social, emotional, behavioral, health, or developmental disability. This experience, combined with additional Parent Empowerment (PEP) training, allows them to provide peer support to parents of children with similar challenges.

10

Bureau of Adult Services (BAS) Adult Protective Services

The NYS Office of Children and Family Services, through its Bureau of Adult Services, is responsible for the oversight of Protective Services for Adults (PSA) and other adult services provided through the local departments of social services, and local operations relative to Family-Type Homes for Adults (FTHA).

The Bureau provides technical assistance to adult services staff of local districts; conducts informal case reviews; participates in audits; reviews consolidated services plans; conducts complaint investigations; and develops public education, training, and interagency initiatives.

This web site is designed to provide information on Protective Services for Adults and to educate the general public on recognizing and responding to adult abuse, neglect and financial exploitation issues.

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Developed by the Council on Children and Families and Funded by the Developmental Disabilities Planning Council