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1

2-1-1/3-1-1

2-1-1 (and 3-1-1 in New York City) are easy-to-remember numbers that helps people cut through what can be a confusing and overwhelming maze of information and resources.

2-1-1 (and 3-1-1 in New York City) helps people assess their needs and links them directly to the resources that will help. Whether you are looking for essential services, seeking volunteer opportunities or starting a small business, 2-1-1 (and 3-1-1 in New York City) is there to help.

2

A Parent's Guide to Special Education in NYS for Children 3-21

This guide contains comprehensive information on the special education process in New York State, beginning with the initial referral for special education services. Special education means specially designed individualized or group instruction or special services or programs to meet the unique needs of students with disabilities. Special education services and programs are provided at no cost to the parent. 

3

Disability Resource Clearinghouse and Navigators

The Justice Center’s Disability Resource Clearinghouse provides information about disability-related programs, services, laws and regulations. This Clearinghouse links to resources from local, state, federal and national agencies, as well as nonprofit organizations. 

NEED FURTHER ASSISTANCE?

If you cannot find the information you need, call a Disability Navigator toll-free at 1-800-624-4143.  Relay users, please dial 7-1-1 or email infoassistance@justicecenter.ny.gov.  

4

Disability.Gov

Disability.gov is the federal government website for comprehensive information about disability-related programs, services, policies, laws and regulations. The site links to thousands of resources from many different federal government agencies, as well as state and local governments and nonprofit organizations across the country.

Every day, new resources are added to Disability.gov’s 10 main subject areas: Benefits, Civil Rights, Community Life, Education, Emergency Preparedness, Employment, Health, Housing, Technology and Transportation. You’ll find information on topics such as Social Security disability benefits, job accommodations for employees with disabilities, accessible housing, and organizations in your state that can help you find a job or live independently.

Please keep in mind that Disability.gov is an “information and referral” website, which means almost every time you select a resource, you will go to another website. For example, a resource about Social Security disability benefits may direct you to  Social Security Administration (www.ssa.gov). Disability.gov is not responsible for the maintenance, accuracy or accessibility of information on these websites.

5

Early Intervention Program

The New York State Early Intervention Program (EIP) is part of the nationwide EIP. It is for infants and toddlers under three years of age who may not be making progress like other children because of a developmental delay or disability. A disability means that a child has a diagnosed physical or mental condition that may lead to developmental problems. These include, but are not limited to, autism, Down syndrome, motor disorders, or vision and hearing problems. A developmental delay means a child is behind in some area of development, such as growth, learning and thinking, or communicating.

The first step is your child's referral to the EIP in the county where you live. All counties in New York State (NYS) and New York City have an EIP. Children who may need services must first be referred to the EIP. Parents can refer their own child to the EIP if they have a concern about their child's development. In NYS, certain professionals are required to refer children to the EIP if a developmental problem is suspected. After referral, your child will be evaluated by qualified professionals. Your county EIP or the New York City EIP will help you get services if your child is found to be eligible. Health insurance, including private insurance and Medicaid, may be used to pay for early intervention services. EIP services must be provided at no cost to you and will not affect your insurance coverage.

View Early Intervention Programs using our MSNavigator Mapping Tool.

 

6

Growing Up Healthy Hotline

The Department of Health operates the Growing Up Healthy Hotline, which provides information about health care, nutrition and other health and human services. The hotline provides information and referral 24 hours/day, seven days a week in English and Spanish and other languages.

7

Independent Living Programs

Centers for Independent Living (CIL) are community-based, cross-disability, non-profit organizations that are designed and operated by people with disabilities. CILs are unique in that they operate according to a strict philosophy of consumer control, wherein people with all types of disabilities directly govern and staff the organization. Centers for Independent Living Provide:

  • Peer Support
  • Information and Referral
  • Individual and Systems Advocacy
  • Independent Living Skills Training

Locate Centers for Independent Living (CIL) using our mapping tool.

8

Interagency Coordination and Case Resolution Bureau

The Hard to Place/Hard to Serve Unit works to assist caregivers and individuals in receiving the most appropriate community-based or residential services; minimize delays in arranging services or placements; and resolves barriers that impede timely service delivery or placement. 

The Hard to Place/Hard to Serve Unit becomes involved ONLY after all program options and dispute resolution procedures have been exhausted at the local and regional levels, or if a caregiver feels their child's needs are not being met by existing systems. 

How to Make a Referral

The agent making a referral on behalf of a child must provide the Council with the following:

  • a completed Hard to Place Unit Intake Form and a signed Release of Information Form;
  • a description of the barriers encountered in attempting to provide appropriate services or placement;
  • a record of the efforts that have been made by the referral source or others to secure services and/or placements for the child; and
  • background information on the child's special needs.

A referral containing all of the information mentioned above may be submitted to:

Regina Canuso, Coordinator, Hard-to-Place/Hard-to-Serve Unit 

Kathleen Rivers, Assistant Coordinator, Hard-to-Place/Hard-to-Serve Unit

Interagency Coordination and Case Resolution Bureau
NYS Council on Children and Families
52 Washington Street
West Building, Suite 99
Rensselaer, NY 12144

Telephone: 518-473-3652
Fax: 518-473-2570
e-mail: regina.canuso@ccf.ny.gov; kathleen.rivers@ccf.ny.gov

9

National Eating Disorders Helpline

In addition to the resources available the National Eating Disorders (NEDA) website, NEDA’s Information and Referral Helpline volunteers are available to help you in assessing options for yourself or a loved one who may be struggling with an eating disorder. Helpline volunteers have extensive training to prepare them to be able to help you find information, treatment and support options.

10

NY Project Hope - Coping with COVID

NY Project Hope helps New Yorkers understand their reactions and emotions during COVID-19. Through an emotional support helpline, educational materials, and trusted referrals, NY Project Hope helps people manage and cope with changes brought on by COVID-19.

NY Project Hope Crisis Counselors understand what you are going through. Talking to them is free, confidential, and anonymous. Talk to someone who is trained, knowledgeable and never judges. Sometimes it helps to talk with someone you don’t know.

Developed by the Council on Children and Families and Funded by the Developmental Disabilities Planning Council