Select language
 
3

Results

Results shown for:

Keyword: residential care

Refine your search results

1

Child Abuse & Maltreatment Hotline - Child Protective Services (CPS)

The New York State Office of Children and Family Services maintains a Statewide Central Register of Child Abuse and Maltreatment (SCR) for reports of child abuse or maltreatment made pursuant to the Social Services Law.

The Statewide Central Register, also known as the "Hotline,” receives telephone calls alleging child abuse or maltreatment within New York State. The Statewide Central Register relays information from the calls to the local Child Protective Service for investigation, monitors their prompt response, and identifies if there are prior child abuse or maltreatment reports.

The Hotline receives calls 24 hours a day, seven days a week from two sources: persons who are required by law, or mandated, to report suspected cases of child abuse and maltreatment; and calls from non-mandated reporters, including the public.

Among those who are mandated to make reports are:

  • medical and hospital personnel
  • school officials
  • social service workers
  • child care workers
  • residential care workers and volunteers
  • law enforcement personnel

*This list is not all inclusive.

Do You Suspect Abuse or Maltreatment?
Report it Now!

Call this Statewide Toll Free Telephone Number:
1-800-342-3720

If you are deaf or hard of hearing, call TDD/TTY at
1-800-638-5163
or have your Video Relay System provider call
1-800-342-3720


If you believe that a child is in immediate danger,
call 911 or your local police department.

2

Single Point of Access (SPOA)

Single Point of Access (SPOA) is part of the NYS Office of Mental Health's (OMH) 2000-2001 initiatives designed to expand the county's existing community based mental health system and help make it a more cohesive and better coordinated system. The goal is to create a system that promotes recovery-oriented services, which are widely available, flexible, personally tailored and responsive to individual needs. Individual's preferences will be integrated into the process. All referrals and transitions between programs and services will be entered into a database, in order to monitor who receives services, who does not, alternative recommendations, and the actual mental health residential and case management needs. There will be periodic reassessment and monitoring of an individual's need for a particular level of care/service.

SPOA Coordinators connect people with serious mental illness to mental health services.

3

Supervision and Treatment Services for Juveniles Program (STSJP)

The Supervision and Treatment Services for Juveniles Program (STSJP) is designed to fund local practices and services that address the needs of youth in the juvenile justice system to promote public safety while serving youth in the least restrictive appropriate setting. STSJP provides municipalities with fiscal incentives to develop and utilize cost effective, community-based programming to divert the following youth from placement in detention or residential care:

  • Youth at risk of becoming, alleged to be, or adjudicated as juvenile delinquents (JDs);
  • Youth alleged to be or adjudicated as persons in need of supervision (PINS); and
  • Youth alleged to be or convicted as juvenile offenders (JOs), from placement in detention or residential care.

Developed by the Council on Children and Families and Funded by the Developmental Disabilities Planning Council