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Keyword: students with disabilities

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1

A Parent's Guide to Special Education in NYS for Children 3-21

This guide contains comprehensive information on the special education process in New York State, beginning with the initial referral for special education services. Special education means specially designed individualized or group instruction or special services or programs to meet the unique needs of students with disabilities. Special education services and programs are provided at no cost to the parent. 

2

ADA, Section 504 & Postsecondary Education

It is important that students and their advocates become knowledgeable about their rights and responsibilities in postsecondary education. Although protections exist, the students have considerably more responsibility in postsecondary education to request their own accommodations. This responsibility is ongoing. For many students with disabilities, good self-advocacy skills are the key to success, and knowing their rights is one essential element of effective self-advocacy.

3

Bullying & Students with Disabilities

This publication provides information for parents and families and schools about the laws, regulations and policies of bullying and harassment in schools. 

4

College - You Can Do It!

In this video presentation, students with disabilities and staff share advice for success in college. It is designed for high school students with disabilities preparing for college.

5

College-level Reading - Tips and Tools to Help with Comprehension and Fluency

This is a guide for parents and students and provides a quick overview of tools and strategies to aid comprehension and fluency while reading college level text.

6

College: You Can Do It! Tip Sheet

This tip sheet provides helpful information to help students with disabilities prepare for college.

The document covers three phases: 

  • Preparing for college while in high school.
  • Staying in college, which requires numerous self-management skills.
  • Preparing to move beyond college and into a career.

7

Disability Scholarships

Passed in 1990, the Americans with Disabilities Act has required schools to accommodate the needs of their disabled students, breaking down many barriers that prevented students from accessing educational resources, and enabling more people to enjoy the full benefits of a college education. Recruitment efforts and financial aid opportunities aimed at disabled students now exist at a number of schools. Additionally, many private organizations award scholarship money to ensure that students with disabilities are able to achieve their college goals, despite potential setbacks such as learning issues, environmental challenges, or medical conflicts.

Disability scholarships exist to provide college funding for students who possess numerous cognitive, behavioral, and emotional impediments that would make it difficult to attain a college degree. These scholarship opportunities help deserving students stay in school and out of debt, allowing them to more easily achieve their educational and career goals.

Disability scholarships are funded by a variety of scholarship providers with different requirements. They can be intended to help students with a specific disability pay for school, or they can be aimed at a wider range of students who have physical or mental issues. Disability scholarship providers may choose to narrow their awards towards students who have completed a specific program or who will attend a particular college or university. Some scholarship awards are aimed at groups that face multiple barriers to education; such as low-income, minority, or females with disabilities. Certain local scholarships might also be earmarked for disabled students.

8

Disciplining Students With Disabilities

There is nothing in IDEA that restricts schools from disciplining children with disabilities. This article is designed to provide a set of practical concepts to improve the chances that positive behaviors will increase and negative behaviors will decrease among children with disabilities who warrant special education and related services under IDEA.

9

Fact Sheet: Restraint and Seclusion of Students with Disabilities

This fact sheet provides a series of questions and answers, issued by the Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights (OCR) to inform school districts how the use of restraint and seclusion may result in discrimination against students with disabilities in violation of federal laws that prohibit disability discrimination, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Section 504).

10

Graduation Requirements for Students with Disabilities

This page provides information on both high school diploma and non-diploma exiting credential options available to New York State students with disabilities. Information is provided on the course work, credit and assessment requirements students must successfully complete to earn a Regents or local high school diploma, including the various safety net options available to assist students with disabilities to earn a local diploma. Requirements, model forms, guidance, and questions and answers for the Skills and Achievement Commencement Credential and the New York State Career Development and Occupational Studies Commencement Credential are also provided.

Developed by the Council on Children and Families and Funded by the Developmental Disabilities Planning Council