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1

2-1-1/3-1-1

2-1-1 (and 3-1-1 in New York City) are easy-to-remember numbers that helps people cut through what can be a confusing and overwhelming maze of information and resources.

2-1-1 (and 3-1-1 in New York City) helps people assess their needs and links them directly to the resources that will help. Whether you are looking for essential services, seeking volunteer opportunities or starting a small business, 2-1-1 (and 3-1-1 in New York City) is there to help.

2

Child Abuse & Maltreatment Hotline - Child Protective Services (CPS)

The New York State Office of Children and Family Services maintains a Statewide Central Register of Child Abuse and Maltreatment (SCR) for reports of child abuse or maltreatment made pursuant to the Social Services Law.

The Statewide Central Register, also known as the "Hotline,” receives telephone calls alleging child abuse or maltreatment within New York State. The Statewide Central Register relays information from the calls to the local Child Protective Service for investigation, monitors their prompt response, and identifies if there are prior child abuse or maltreatment reports.

The Hotline receives calls 24 hours a day, seven days a week from two sources: persons who are required by law, or mandated, to report suspected cases of child abuse and maltreatment; and calls from non-mandated reporters, including the public.

Among those who are mandated to make reports are:

  • medical and hospital personnel
  • school officials
  • social service workers
  • child care workers
  • residential care workers and volunteers
  • law enforcement personnel

*This list is not all inclusive.

Do You Suspect Abuse or Maltreatment?
Report it Now!

Call this Statewide Toll Free Telephone Number:
1-800-342-3720

If you are deaf or hard of hearing, call TDD/TTY at
1-800-638-5163
or have your Video Relay System provider call
1-800-342-3720


If you believe that a child is in immediate danger,
call 911 or your local police department.

3

COMBAT HEROIN and Prescription Drug Abuse

Information and resources on opioid addictions prevention and treatment and how to get involved in solutions. This website also includes videos of real stories. Addiction can happen to anyone, any family, at any time.

 

4

Developmental Disability State Operations Offices (DDSOOs)

Developmental Disabilities State Operations Offices (DDSOOs) administer and oversee state operations for the Office for People With Developmental Disabilities (OPWDD), including the direct delivery of services and supports to people with developmental disabilities by state staff.  By focusing on local supports and services, statewide quality and consistency, and enhanced networking to promote best practices, DDSOOs are able to provide a consistent approach and culture, so that individuals and their families can expect continuous quality improvement in all services delivered directly by OPWDD across the state.

DDSOOs are responsible for the following activities:

  • development and monitoring of OPWDD systems improvement (e.g., continuous quality improvement processes, plans of corrective action (POCAs), informed consent and Behavior Management Committees);
  • offering specialized supports/services and service delivery in the areas of clinical and food services, waiver services and volunteers/senior companions;
  • acting in the capacity of advocate when responding to stakeholder questions and legislative inquiries;
  • oversight of support services (e.g., Medicaid compliance, HIPAA compliance and clinical records review);
  • oversight of the Statewide Technical Assistance Team, which provides pre-survey and focused technical assistance activities to campus-based ICFs and other state-operated community-based residential programs in which quality improvement issues have been identified; and ensures ongoing compliance with federal requirements and  that program certification is maintained;
  • management, on the local level, a variety of OPWDD statewide electronic billing and recordkeeping systems
  • oversight of the day-to-day administration of State-operated Family Care; and
  • oversight and coordination of fire safety initiatives, including development of evacuation plans in state-operated programs, and establishing and maintaining working relationships with local fire departments.

Eligibility for services is determined by the Developmental Disabilities Regional Offices (DDROs). Please contact the Eligibility Coordinator of the Regional Office representing the county in which the individual/family lives.

Lastly, DDSOOs act in a supporting role to DD Regional Offices in the areas of service development, local management of individual and community supports and crisis intervention.

View DDSOOs using our MSNavigator Mapping Tool. 

5

Find and Keep Housing for Transitional Age and Former Foster Youth

This Honoring Emancipated Youth Housing Guide provides practical advice on how to find and keep housing for transitional age and former foster youth. The guide was written by former foster youth, volunteers and community members. This guide is dedicated to housing and is a valuable resource to any young person, but especially former foster youth and disconnected transitional aged youth. This guide strives to provide guidance to youth ages 18-24 to procure safe and affordable housing.

Note: This guide was written for California youth, but was included here because of the valuable information contained within.

 

6

Mobile Apps

Mobile applications can be effective tools that make therapy more accessible, efficient, and portable for those with anxiety disorders, depression, OCD, PTSD, and other related disorders. This webpage contains reviews of the mobile apps by ADAA members. These volunteer reviewers are mental health professionals with degrees in psychology, medicine, social work, and counseling; they are not involved in the development or marketing of mobile apps.

7

National Eating Disorders Helpline

In addition to the resources available the National Eating Disorders (NEDA) website, NEDA’s Information and Referral Helpline volunteers are available to help you in assessing options for yourself or a loved one who may be struggling with an eating disorder. Helpline volunteers have extensive training to prepare them to be able to help you find information, treatment and support options.

8

Parent to Parent of NYS Regional Offices

Parent to Parent Regional Offices are staffed by people who have walked the walk and are available to help other families:

  • Support – Parent to Parent offers parents/caregivers the opportunity to connect one-to-one with a parent/caregiver of an individual with the same or similar disability or special health care need – someone who has “been there.”
  • Information & Referral – Parent to Parent helps families locate the information and services they need.
  • Training – Workshops are available on Understanding Medicaid Service Coordination, Record Keeping and Using a Health Care Notebook, and various other topics.

The organization’s parent-matching program is based on a model program used across the country. Parent to Parent assists a parent, who has a child with a developmental disability and/or special health care needs, by locating a volunteer support parent who has a similar experience. When a family initially receives a diagnosis, the emotional response can be overwhelming. Talking with another parent is an excellent resource with helping come to terms with emotional acceptance. You are not alone.

View Parent to Parent of NYS Regional Offices using our MSNavigator Mapping Tool.

9

Prevent Child Abuse New York Website

The Prevent Child Abuse New York (PCANY) website provides helpful information related to child abuse and neglect. Some of the resources on this site include:

  • Support and Advocacy for Parents
  • Become a PCANY Volunteer
  • Tips for Parents
  • Tips for Kids
  • Link to Find a Parenting Program

10

Reporting and Investigations Process Explained - Justice Center

The Justice Center’s goal is to prevent mistreatment of people with special needs and ensure that all allegations of abuse or neglect are fully investigated. The Justice Center investigates, reviews and makes findings in allegations of abuse and neglect by staff—including employees, volunteers, interns, consultants, or contractors— against individuals who receive services. The Justice Center does not interrogate, arrest, or prosecute individuals who receive services.

This document explains the reporting and investigation process and how to obtain additional information if you, or your family member, is involved in a Justice Center investigation as a victim or a witness.

Developed by the Council on Children and Families and Funded by the Developmental Disabilities Planning Council