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Support Groups

Autonomous groups of individuals who share a common problem or concern, either directly or through their partners and families, who meet together on a voluntary basis, either in-person, by telephone or via the Internet, to fulfill a need, overcome a disability or cope with a crisis. Members of mutual support groups share their experiences, strengths and hopes and rely on one another for emotional support, information and resources. 

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Support Groups

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1

2-1-1/3-1-1

2-1-1 (and 3-1-1 in New York City) are easy-to-remember numbers that helps people cut through what can be a confusing and overwhelming maze of information and resources.

2-1-1 (and 3-1-1 in New York City) helps people assess their needs and links them directly to the resources that will help. Whether you are looking for essential services, seeking volunteer opportunities or starting a small business, 2-1-1 (and 3-1-1 in New York City) is there to help.

2

ACR Health Hotline

Provides various support groups for Leisbian, Gay, Bisexual and Questioning youth ages 13-25 and Transyouth ages 5-25 as well as Family Support will a Credentialed Family Peer Advocate for Families of Transyouth.

3

Addiction Recovery Resources

This website provides links to support groups and resources for individuals in recovery, as well as information for their family and friends. Participation in these recovery programs is free.

4

Alcohol Rehab Guide

The Alcohol Rehab Guide is an online resource created to help people struggling with an alcohol addiction find treatment when they need it most. The team at ARG is made up of recovering addicts and industry professionals who are dedicated to helping everyone find hope in recovery.

ARG provides life-saving information and guidance to help people suffering from alcoholism find and stay in recovery.

5

Anxiety and Depression Association of America

This website provides helpful information for caregivers for the prevention, treatment and cure of anxiety and mood disorders, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD), and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). It also provides helpful information on school avoidance and many other related topics.

6

Become a Family Peer Advocate (FPA)

Family Peer Advocates are valuable professionals within the child serving system. They are uniquely qualified to work with families based on their first-hand experience as the parent/caregiver of a young person with a social, emotional, behavioral, health, or developmental disability. This experience, combined with additional Parent Empowerment (PEP) training, allows them to provide peer support to parents of children with similar challenges.

7

Bravehearts - Motivating Others through Voices of Experiences (M.O.V.E.) NY

The mission of the Bravehearts is to empower young adults touched by the child welfare system to become active and authentic leaders in their own lives as they transition into adulthood.

Located in Westchester County, Bravehearts M.O.V.E. New York is the chapter-lead for the state and an authentic youth-led non-profit. They work to improve services and systems that support positive growth and development by uniting the voices of individuals who have lived experience in various systems including mental health, juvenile justice, education and child welfare.

A Braveheart is any young adult, aged 14-26 who has overcome adversity, persevered through difficult times and come out as a stronger and wiser version of themselves.

8

COMBAT HEROIN and Prescription Drug Abuse

Information and resources on opioid addictions prevention and treatment and how to get involved in solutions. This website also includes videos of real stories. Addiction can happen to anyone, any family, at any time.

 

9

Developmental Disabilities Regional Offices (DDROs)

Developmental Disabilities Regional Offices (DDROs) are the starting point to apply for services. With an eye to enhanced oversight and quality improvement, the Office for People With Developmental Disabilities (OPWDD) has established regions (“catchment areas”) that allow for better coordination of services with the State Office of Mental Health, State Department of Health and other agencies with whom we often partner in providing services.

In order to assist individuals and families to make informed choices about the supports and services best suited to their needs, DDROs work with local voluntary provider agencies to improve access to and coordinate services within a region (“catchment area”).

DDROs are responsible for the following activities:

  • eligibility;
  • intake;
  • waiver enrollment (a Federal-State partnership which makes certain types of services available within the home or community so as to avoid placement in an institution);
  • local management of Individual and Community Supports (ICS);
  • management of resources for crisis intervention;
  • advocacy;
  • shared management of OPWDD statewide applications;
  • service recruitment and development for the Family Care  program; and
  • programs, services and supports for aging individuals with developmental disabilities.

Eligibility for services is determined by the Developmental Disabilities Regional Offices (DDROs).  Please contact the Eligibility Coordinator of the Regional Office representing the county in which the individual/family lives.

Lastly, DDROs act in a supporting role to DD State Operations Offices with regard to eligibility for others areas of statewide services including but not limited to: level of care determinations; clinical delivery and waiver service delivery; Article 16 clinics; quality improvement processes; review of audit reports for trend analysis; emergency preparedness; safety, security and maintenance; and implementation of OPWDD initiatives.

View DDROs using our MSNavigator Mapping Tool. 

10

Disability Rights NY Hotlines & Resources

All requests for assistance are processed by DRNY's Intake Office. The vast majority of requests for assistance are received and processed by telephone or TTY. The intake office is available to conduct telephone or in-person intake interviews Monday through Friday between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m, and includes Spanish speaking staff.

Developed by the Council on Children and Families and Funded by the Developmental Disabilities Planning Council