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Financial Supports

Financial supports are programs that pay for the care and/or associated expenses of people who are unable to obtain necessary care without assistance. Medical and educational expense assistance programs may have age, income, disability, need or other eligibility requirements.

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Financial Supports

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1

2-1-1/3-1-1

2-1-1 (and 3-1-1 in New York City) are easy-to-remember numbers that helps people cut through what can be a confusing and overwhelming maze of information and resources.

2-1-1 (and 3-1-1 in New York City) helps people assess their needs and links them directly to the resources that will help. Whether you are looking for essential services, seeking volunteer opportunities or starting a small business, 2-1-1 (and 3-1-1 in New York City) is there to help.

2

A-Z of Disabilities and Accommodations

The Job Accommodation Network (JAN) provides free consulting services for individuals with physical or intellectual limitations that affect employment. Services include one-on-one consultation about job accommodation ideas, requesting and negotiating accommodations, and rights under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and related laws. Although JAN does not help individuals find employment, JAN does provide information for job seekers.

JAN provides information on: various disabilities, impairments, and conditions; accommodations and other ADA issues; and accommodation ideas by physical limitations.

3

ABLE Accounts: 10 Things You Should Know

ABLE Accounts are tax-advantaged savings accounts for individuals with disabilities and their families. The beneficiary of the account is the account owner, and income earned by the accounts will not be taxed. Contributions to the account made by any person (the account beneficiary, family and friends) will be made using post-taxed dollars and will not be tax deductible, although some states may allow for state income tax deductions for contribution made to an ABLE account.

4

ACCESS NYC

Find help in NYC with food, money, housing, work and more on ACCESS NYC. There are over 30 programs you or your family may be eligible for regardless of immigration status and even if you’re already receiving benefits or have a job.

5

Benefit Development Resource Guide

The Benefit Development Resource Guide (Resource Guide) is designed to assist employees who are responsible for developing the benefits and entitlements necessary to fund services for individuals served by OPWDD and voluntary provider agencies. It is not intended to be read from cover to cover, though those new to the topics discussed may wish to do so. The Resource Guide is primarily intended to be used as a reference during the process of assisting individuals in developing the benefits necessary to fund their care.

This guide provides detailed information about conducting eligibility investigations, protecting assets, and applying for Medicaid, the OPWDD Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Waiver, Supplemental Security Income (SSI), Social Security benefits (SSDI), Medicare, and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP – formerly called Food Stamps). The manual consists of this introduction and the following sections:

  • Benefit Development
  • Liability for Services
  • Medicaid
  • Home and Community Based Services Waiver
  • Supplemental Security Income
  • Social Security Benefits 
  • Work Incentives 
  • Medicare
  • Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program
  • Resource Management
  • Additional Resources

6

Casey Life Sills (CLS) Assessment Tool

The Casey Life Skills (CLS) tool is a tool for youth to build their own personal checklist of skills and strengths. It shows them what they know already and what is possible for them to learn in the future. A case worker or mentor needs to help them create a free account.

7

College: You Can Do It! Tip Sheet

This tip sheet provides helpful information to help students with disabilities prepare for college.

The document covers three phases: 

  • Preparing for college while in high school.
  • Staying in college, which requires numerous self-management skills.
  • Preparing to move beyond college and into a career.

8

Developmental Disabilities Regional Offices (DDROs)

Developmental Disabilities Regional Offices (DDROs) are the starting point to apply for services. With an eye to enhanced oversight and quality improvement, the Office for People With Developmental Disabilities (OPWDD) has established regions (“catchment areas”) that allow for better coordination of services with the State Office of Mental Health, State Department of Health and other agencies with whom we often partner in providing services.

In order to assist individuals and families to make informed choices about the supports and services best suited to their needs, DDROs work with local voluntary provider agencies to improve access to and coordinate services within a region (“catchment area”).

DDROs are responsible for the following activities:

  • eligibility;
  • intake;
  • waiver enrollment (a Federal-State partnership which makes certain types of services available within the home or community so as to avoid placement in an institution);
  • local management of Individual and Community Supports (ICS);
  • management of resources for crisis intervention;
  • advocacy;
  • shared management of OPWDD statewide applications;
  • service recruitment and development for the Family Care  program; and
  • programs, services and supports for aging individuals with developmental disabilities.

Eligibility for services is determined by the Developmental Disabilities Regional Offices (DDROs).  Please contact the Eligibility Coordinator of the Regional Office representing the county in which the individual/family lives.

Lastly, DDROs act in a supporting role to DD State Operations Offices with regard to eligibility for others areas of statewide services including but not limited to: level of care determinations; clinical delivery and waiver service delivery; Article 16 clinics; quality improvement processes; review of audit reports for trend analysis; emergency preparedness; safety, security and maintenance; and implementation of OPWDD initiatives.

View DDROs using our MSNavigator Mapping Tool. 

9

Disability Provider Directory

The NYS Office For People With Developmental Disabilities and its associated voluntary agencies offer many services to individuals and their families. This interactive directory lists services by service type and location.

10

Disability Services Portal

This disability services portal was developed to ensure that any person with a disability could quickly and easily identify services and other supports in New York State that might support them in moving toward employment. The service calculator does not determine eligibility but will generate a report of various agencies that may be able to provide services and supports to assist an individual with a disability in going to work.

Developed by the Council on Children and Families and Funded by the Developmental Disabilities Planning Council