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At-Home Services

At-home services are supportive care provided in the home. Care may be provided by licensed healthcare professionals who provide medical care needs or by professional caregivers who provide daily care to help to ensure the activities of daily living (ADL's) are met. In-home medical care is often and more accurately referred to as "home health care" or formal care. 

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At-Home Services

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1

2-1-1/3-1-1

2-1-1 (and 3-1-1 in New York City) are easy-to-remember numbers that helps people cut through what can be a confusing and overwhelming maze of information and resources.

2-1-1 (and 3-1-1 in New York City) helps people assess their needs and links them directly to the resources that will help. Whether you are looking for essential services, seeking volunteer opportunities or starting a small business, 2-1-1 (and 3-1-1 in New York City) is there to help.

2

Accessing Home and Community-Based Services: A Guide for Self-Advocates

Accessing Home and Community-Based Services: A Guide for Self Advocates is a tool designed to help people with disabilities, families, and friends find and use available resources. This may include family and friends, community-based services, state funded waivers and programs, and other resources to help empower people with disabilities to live as independently as possible and make our own choices about what we need. It is a tool to inform about various resources and how to access them. It is also a reference about resources that, although you may not need or want them now, you can use in the future.

3

Become a Family Peer Advocate (FPA)

Family Peer Advocates are valuable professionals within the child serving system. They are uniquely qualified to work with families based on their first-hand experience as the parent/caregiver of a young person with a social, emotional, behavioral, health, or developmental disability. This experience, combined with additional Parent Empowerment (PEP) training, allows them to provide peer support to parents of children with similar challenges.

4

Behavioral Health Treatment Services Locator Map

The SAMHSA Behavioral Health Treatment Locator Map provides location and contact information for the following issues:

  • Substance Abuse
  • Mental Health
  • Substance Abuse & Mental Health
  • Health Care Centers
  • Veteran's Affairs

This map allows users to filter by location, distance and type of program.

5

Benefit Development Resource Guide

The Benefit Development Resource Guide (Resource Guide) is designed to assist employees who are responsible for developing the benefits and entitlements necessary to fund services for individuals served by OPWDD and voluntary provider agencies. It is not intended to be read from cover to cover, though those new to the topics discussed may wish to do so. The Resource Guide is primarily intended to be used as a reference during the process of assisting individuals in developing the benefits necessary to fund their care.

This guide provides detailed information about conducting eligibility investigations, protecting assets, and applying for Medicaid, the OPWDD Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Waiver, Supplemental Security Income (SSI), Social Security benefits (SSDI), Medicare, and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP – formerly called Food Stamps). The manual consists of this introduction and the following sections:

  • Benefit Development
  • Liability for Services
  • Medicaid
  • Home and Community Based Services Waiver
  • Supplemental Security Income
  • Social Security Benefits 
  • Work Incentives 
  • Medicare
  • Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program
  • Resource Management
  • Additional Resources

6

Developmental Disabilities Regional Offices (DDROs)

Developmental Disabilities Regional Offices (DDROs) are the starting point to apply for services. With an eye to enhanced oversight and quality improvement, the Office for People With Developmental Disabilities (OPWDD) has established regions (“catchment areas”) that allow for better coordination of services with the State Office of Mental Health, State Department of Health and other agencies with whom we often partner in providing services.

In order to assist individuals and families to make informed choices about the supports and services best suited to their needs, DDROs work with local voluntary provider agencies to improve access to and coordinate services within a region (“catchment area”).

DDROs are responsible for the following activities:

  • eligibility;
  • intake;
  • waiver enrollment (a Federal-State partnership which makes certain types of services available within the home or community so as to avoid placement in an institution);
  • local management of Individual and Community Supports (ICS);
  • management of resources for crisis intervention;
  • advocacy;
  • shared management of OPWDD statewide applications;
  • service recruitment and development for the Family Care  program; and
  • programs, services and supports for aging individuals with developmental disabilities.

Eligibility for services is determined by the Developmental Disabilities Regional Offices (DDROs).  Please contact the Eligibility Coordinator of the Regional Office representing the county in which the individual/family lives.

Lastly, DDROs act in a supporting role to DD State Operations Offices with regard to eligibility for others areas of statewide services including but not limited to: level of care determinations; clinical delivery and waiver service delivery; Article 16 clinics; quality improvement processes; review of audit reports for trend analysis; emergency preparedness; safety, security and maintenance; and implementation of OPWDD initiatives.

View DDROs using our MSNavigator Mapping Tool. 

7

Disability Provider Directory

The NYS Office For People With Developmental Disabilities and its associated voluntary agencies offer many services to individuals and their families. This interactive directory lists services by service type and location.

8

Early Intervention Program

The NYS Early Intervention Program (EIP) is part of the national Early Intervention Program for infants and toddlers with disabilities and their families. First created by Congress in 1986 under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), the EIP is administered by the New York State Department of Health through the Bureau of Early Intervention. In New York State, the Early Intervention Program is established in Article 25 of the Public Health Law and has been in effect since July 1, 1993.

View Early Intervention Programs using our MSNavigator Mapping Tool.

9

Eight Essential Hallmarks of Person Centered Planning

The NYS Office for Persons with Developmental Disabilities (OPWDD) has defined eight hallmarks essential to the success of the person centered planning process designed to achieve personal outcomes identified by the person themselves. Each hallmark has a set of performance indicators that help determine if you and people you support are moving forward in a manner that is truly person centered.

10

Family Care Navigator

The Family Care Navigator provides information on:

  • Government Health & Disability Programs
  • Services for Care Recipients Living at Home
  • Services & Policies for Family Caregivers
  • Resources on Living Arrangements for Care Recipients
  • General Information & Assistance
  • Legal Help & Advocacy
  • Disease-Specific Organiations

Developed by the Council on Children and Families and Funded by the Developmental Disabilities Planning Council