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Community Care

Assistance with daily living needs for independent living or a combination of ongoing in-home or out-of-home care supportive arrangements which may include care in an individual's own home by relatives or other caregivers; care in their own homes combined with participation in an adult day care or similar program; residence in an assisted living facility, adult foster home, life care community, or other supervised living facility; case management; and advocacy.

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Community Care

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1

2-1-1/3-1-1

2-1-1 (and 3-1-1 in New York City) are easy-to-remember numbers that helps people cut through what can be a confusing and overwhelming maze of information and resources.

2-1-1 (and 3-1-1 in New York City) helps people assess their needs and links them directly to the resources that will help. Whether you are looking for essential services, seeking volunteer opportunities or starting a small business, 2-1-1 (and 3-1-1 in New York City) is there to help.

2

29-I Health Facility (Voluntary Foster Care Agency Transition)

Voluntary Foster Care Agencies (VFCAs) must be licensed for the provision of limited health-related services to contract and bill Medicaid Managed Care Plans and comply with Corporate Practice of Medicine standards. To be licensed as a VFCA Health Facility, the foster care agency must apply to the NYS Office of Children and Family Services and the NYS Department of Health and include limited health-related services to be provided, the location and physical description of the physical plant, and other required information.

3

Accessing Home and Community-Based Services: A Guide for Self-Advocates

Accessing Home and Community-Based Services: A Guide for Self Advocates is a tool designed to help people with disabilities, families, and friends find and use available resources. This may include family and friends, community-based services, state funded waivers and programs, and other resources to help empower people with disabilities to live as independently as possible and make our own choices about what we need. It is a tool to inform about various resources and how to access them. It is also a reference about resources that, although you may not need or want them now, you can use in the future.

4

Become a Family Peer Advocate (FPA)

Family Peer Advocates are valuable professionals within the child serving system. They are uniquely qualified to work with families based on their first-hand experience as the parent/caregiver of a young person with a social, emotional, behavioral, health, or developmental disability. This experience, combined with additional Parent Empowerment (PEP) training, allows them to provide peer support to parents of children with similar challenges.

5

Behavioral Health Treatment Services Locator Map

The SAMHSA Behavioral Health Treatment Locator Map provides location and contact information for the following issues:

  • Substance Abuse
  • Mental Health
  • Substance Abuse & Mental Health
  • Health Care Centers
  • Veteran's Affairs

This map allows users to filter by location, distance and type of program.

6

Benefit Development Resource Guide

The Benefit Development Resource Guide (Resource Guide) is designed to assist employees who are responsible for developing the benefits and entitlements necessary to fund services for individuals served by OPWDD and voluntary provider agencies. It is not intended to be read from cover to cover, though those new to the topics discussed may wish to do so. The Resource Guide is primarily intended to be used as a reference during the process of assisting individuals in developing the benefits necessary to fund their care.

This guide provides detailed information about conducting eligibility investigations, protecting assets, and applying for Medicaid, the OPWDD Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Waiver, Supplemental Security Income (SSI), Social Security benefits (SSDI), Medicare, and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP – formerly called Food Stamps). The manual consists of this introduction and the following sections:

  • Benefit Development
  • Liability for Services
  • Medicaid
  • Home and Community Based Services Waiver
  • Supplemental Security Income
  • Social Security Benefits 
  • Work Incentives 
  • Medicare
  • Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program
  • Resource Management
  • Additional Resources

7

Casey Life Sills (CLS) Assessment Tool

The Casey Life Skills (CLS) tool is a tool for youth to build their own personal checklist of skills and strengths. It shows them what they know already and what is possible for them to learn in the future. A case worker or mentor needs to help them create a free account.

8

Children and Family Treatment and Support Services

The NYS Office of Mental Health (OMH) designed Children and Family Treatment Support (CFTSS) brochures, fact sheets, posters and FAQs in multiple languages. CFTSS provides mental health and/or substance abuse services in NYS Medicaid for children ages birth to 21. Services can be provided at home, in the community, or wherever children/youth and their families feel comfortable.

9

Children's Home and Community Based Services (CHCBS)

Children's Home and Community Based Services are for children and youth (under age 21) who:

  1. Are enrolled or eligible to enroll in Medicaid - Some children/youth may be eligible for Medicaid if they are eligible for Children’s HCBS. If a child/youth does not have Medicaid and you think they may be eligible for HCBS, call C-YES at 1-833-333-2937
  2. Need extra care at home or in the community to avoid the need for long-term inpatient care
  3. Are in a higher level of care and would be able to stay at home with extra support

The NYS Office of Mental Health created multiple HSBC brochures and Q&A.

10

Community, Work and Independence, Inc.

Community, Work & Independence, Inc (CWI), headquartered in Glens Falls, NY, offers a diverse array of services for individuals with disabilities in Warren, Washington, Saratoga and Essex Counties.  Services include:  Residential, Day Habilitation, Community Supports, Pre-vcational and Employment Services, Clinical Services and Consumer Directed Personal Assistance Program. Funding sources include OPWDD, OMH, ACCES-VR and DOH.

Developed by the Council on Children and Families and Funded by the Developmental Disabilities Planning Council