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Respite

Respite programs provide a brief period of relief or rest for family members, guardians or other people who are regular caregivers for dependent adults or children by offering temporary or intermittent care in the home or in community settings/facilities.

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1

2-1-1/3-1-1

2-1-1 (and 3-1-1 in New York City) are easy-to-remember numbers that helps people cut through what can be a confusing and overwhelming maze of information and resources.

2-1-1 (and 3-1-1 in New York City) helps people assess their needs and links them directly to the resources that will help. Whether you are looking for essential services, seeking volunteer opportunities or starting a small business, 2-1-1 (and 3-1-1 in New York City) is there to help.

2

Accessing Home and Community-Based Services: A Guide for Self-Advocates

Accessing Home and Community-Based Services: A Guide for Self Advocates is a tool designed to help people with disabilities, families, and friends find and use available resources. This may include family and friends, community-based services, state funded waivers and programs, and other resources to help empower people with disabilities to live as independently as possible and make our own choices about what we need. It is a tool to inform about various resources and how to access them. It is also a reference about resources that, although you may not need or want them now, you can use in the future.

3

Become a Family Peer Advocate (FPA)

Family Peer Advocates are valuable professionals within the child serving system. They are uniquely qualified to work with families based on their first-hand experience as the parent/caregiver of a young person with a social, emotional, behavioral, health, or developmental disability. This experience, combined with additional Parent Empowerment (PEP) training, allows them to provide peer support to parents of children with similar challenges.

4

Benefit Development Resource Guide

The Benefit Development Resource Guide (Resource Guide) is designed to assist employees who are responsible for developing the benefits and entitlements necessary to fund services for individuals served by OPWDD and voluntary provider agencies. It is not intended to be read from cover to cover, though those new to the topics discussed may wish to do so. The Resource Guide is primarily intended to be used as a reference during the process of assisting individuals in developing the benefits necessary to fund their care.

This guide provides detailed information about conducting eligibility investigations, protecting assets, and applying for Medicaid, the OPWDD Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Waiver, Supplemental Security Income (SSI), Social Security benefits (SSDI), Medicare, and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP – formerly called Food Stamps). The manual consists of this introduction and the following sections:

  • Benefit Development
  • Liability for Services
  • Medicaid
  • Home and Community Based Services Waiver
  • Supplemental Security Income
  • Social Security Benefits 
  • Work Incentives 
  • Medicare
  • Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program
  • Resource Management
  • Additional Resources

5

Culturally Competent Care for LGBTQ Older Adults Video

This video, jointly produced by the Center for Consumer Engagement in Health Innovaton and SAGE, the nation’s largest and oldest organization serving lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender elders, looks at the unique experiences and needs of LGBTQ older adults to get at the vital importance of providers making efforts to become familiar with the diverse populations they serve, and be ready to meet consumers where they are in providing for their health care needs.

6

Developmental Disabilities Regional Offices (DDROs)

Developmental Disabilities Regional Offices (DDROs) are the starting point to apply for services. With an eye to enhanced oversight and quality improvement, the Office for People With Developmental Disabilities (OPWDD) has established regions (“catchment areas”) that allow for better coordination of services with the State Office of Mental Health, State Department of Health and other agencies with whom we often partner in providing services.

In order to assist individuals and families to make informed choices about the supports and services best suited to their needs, DDROs work with local voluntary provider agencies to improve access to and coordinate services within a region (“catchment area”).

DDROs are responsible for the following activities:

  • eligibility;
  • intake;
  • waiver enrollment (a Federal-State partnership which makes certain types of services available within the home or community so as to avoid placement in an institution);
  • local management of Individual and Community Supports (ICS);
  • management of resources for crisis intervention;
  • advocacy;
  • shared management of OPWDD statewide applications;
  • service recruitment and development for the Family Care  program; and
  • programs, services and supports for aging individuals with developmental disabilities.

Eligibility for services is determined by the Developmental Disabilities Regional Offices (DDROs).  Please contact the Eligibility Coordinator of the Regional Office representing the county in which the individual/family lives.

Lastly, DDROs act in a supporting role to DD State Operations Offices with regard to eligibility for others areas of statewide services including but not limited to: level of care determinations; clinical delivery and waiver service delivery; Article 16 clinics; quality improvement processes; review of audit reports for trend analysis; emergency preparedness; safety, security and maintenance; and implementation of OPWDD initiatives.

View DDROs using our MSNavigator Mapping Tool. 

7

Developmental Disability Respite for Bronx & Manhattan

This program offers day, overnight and weekend respite services for families who reside in Manhattan and the Bronx with children or adults who have developmental disabilities.

Consumers will be cared for at a freestanding site to allow families some rest time or to take care of personal issues, or in the event of an emergency.

8

Disability Provider Directory

The NYS Office For People With Developmental Disabilities and its associated voluntary agencies offer many services to individuals and their families. This interactive directory lists services by service type and location.

9

Everything You Need to Know About OPWDD Eligibility

This series of videos gives an introduction to the OPWDD eligibility process, and process for obtaining services. 

  • What is OPWDD, where to start and what is eligibility? Basic introduction to accessing services for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities in New York. Introduces Office for People with Developmental Disabilities (OPWDD) and the concept of eligibility for OPWDD funded services.
  • What is needed to apply for OPWDD eligibility? Discusses evaluations required for applying for eligibility and steps required for submitting paperwork to the Office for People with Developmental Disabilities (OPWDD).

  • Eligibility attained, what now? Once a person has established eligibility, what are the next steps? How do you access services? What services are there?

10

Family Care Navigator

The Family Care Navigator provides information on:

  • Government Health & Disability Programs
  • Services for Care Recipients Living at Home
  • Services & Policies for Family Caregivers
  • Resources on Living Arrangements for Care Recipients
  • General Information & Assistance
  • Legal Help & Advocacy
  • Disease-Specific Organizations

Developed by the Council on Children and Families and Funded by the Developmental Disabilities Planning Council