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Criminal Activity/Delinquency/Juvenile Justice

Criminal activity also known as "juvenile offending", is participation in illegal behavior by minors (juveniles, i.e. individuals younger than the statutory age of majority - in NYS currently age 16). Most legal systems prescribe specific procedures for dealing with juveniles, such as juvenile detention centers, and courts. Depending on the type and severity of the offense committed, it is possible for persons under 18 to be charged and tried as adults.

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Criminal Activity/Delinquency/Juvenile Justice

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1

About Family Court - Need to Know Series

Youth living in foster care have their cases heard in Family Court, a court which deals with issues of families, children, and youth. You, like many others, may have questions about Family Court, what to expect there, how to present yourself effectively and what the terms used there mean. This pamphlet was designed to help you understand Family Court. After you’ve read this pamphlet, you can talk to your caseworker or attorney regarding any questions you may have.

 

2

Arc Fact Sheets

The Arc has compiled a series of brief, two-page fact sheets for family members, advocates, professionals, media, researchers, policymakers and others that provide an overview of a specific topic related to intellectual disability. A wide variety of topics are covered, from the causes of intellectual disability to various types of syndromes to criminal justice/victimization issues.

3

Bravehearts - Motivating Others through Voices of Experiences (M.O.V.E.) NY

The mission of the Bravehearts is to empower young adults touched by the child welfare system to become active and authentic leaders in their own lives as they transition into adulthood.

Located in Westchester County, Bravehearts M.O.V.E. New York is the chapter-lead for the state and an authentic youth-led non-profit. They work to improve services and systems that support positive growth and development by uniting the voices of individuals who have lived experience in various systems including mental health, juvenile justice, education and child welfare.

A Braveheart is any young adult, aged 14-26 who has overcome adversity, persevered through difficult times and come out as a stronger and wiser version of themselves.

4

Building a School Responder Model

The School Responder Model (SRM) is a response to school infractions that aims to address behavioral health needs and reduce the likelihood of juvenile justice involvement. This interactive web application provides data and practical activities to address behavioral health issues.

5

Close to Home Initiative

"Close to Home" is a juvenile justice reform initiative designed to keep youth close to their families and community. As part of a continued commitment to build on reforms of the state's juvenile justice system implemented in 2011-12, Governor Andrew M. Cuomo included the "Close to Home" initiative in his 2012/2013 Executive Budget Proposal.  The initiative allows New York City youth adjudicated as juvenile delinquents, whom Family Court has determined do not require a secure placement, to be placed in the custody of the New York City Administration for Children's Services (ACS) for residential services and aftercare. 

6

Final Report of the Governor's Commission on Youth, Public Safety and Justice

This report covers: 

  • The History of Juvenile Justice Reforms
  • A Snapshot of the Current System
  • Best Practices in Adolescent Justice
  • Raising the Age of Juvenile Jurisdiction
  • Arrest and Diversion
  • Court Process
  • Removing Youth from Adult Jail and Prison Facilities
  • Effective Disposition Services and Facilities
  • Re-entry
  • Addressing Collateral Consequences of a Criminal Record
  • Projected Case Processing

7

Find a Behavioral Health Provider

Use this mental health online provider directory to find a behavioral health provider in New York State.

8

How to Get a Good Start on the Outside

This guide provides helpful tips and contact information for various services for people that have recently been released from prison and are transitioning back into society.

9

Interagency Case Resolution Unit

The Interagency Case Resolution Unit works to assist caregivers and individuals in receiving the most appropriate community-based or residential services; minimize delays in arranging services or placements, and resolves barriers that impede timely service delivery or placement. 

The Interagency Case Resolution Unit becomes involved ONLY after all program options and dispute resolution procedures have been exhausted at the local and regional levels, or if a caregiver feels their child's needs are not being met by existing systems. 

How to Make a Referral

The agent making a referral on behalf of a child must provide the Council with the following:

  • a completed Intake Form and a signed Release of Information Form;
  • a description of the barriers encountered in attempting to provide appropriate services or placement;
  • a record of the efforts that have been made by the referral source or others to secure services and/or placements for the child; and
  • background information on the child's special needs.

A referral containing all of the information mentioned above may be submitted to:

Sheila Jackson, Coordinator, Interagency Case Resolution Unit 

Kathleen Rivers, Assistant Coordinator, Interagency Case Resolution Unit

Interagency Case Resolution Unit
NYS Council on Children and Families
52 Washington Street
West Building, Suite 99
Rensselaer, NY 12144

Telephone: 518-473-3652
Fax: 518-473-2570
e-mail: sheila.jackson@ccf.ny.gov; kathleen.rivers@ccf.ny.gov

10

National Human Trafficking Hotline

The National Human Trafficking Hotline is a national, anti-trafficking hotline and resource center serving victims and survivors of human trafficking and the anti-trafficking community in the United States.  The toll-free hotline is answered live 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year. Callers can speak with the Hotline in English or Spanish, or in more than 200 additional languages using a 24-hour tele-interpreting service. When you call the Hotline at 1-888-373-7888, you can expect a specially trained and experienced Anti-Trafficking Hotline Advocate who will speak with you about your needs, your options, and the resources we have available to help. The National Hotline is operated by Polaris.

You can also email the Hotline at help@humantraffickinghotline.org or report a tip using our online tip reporting form.

Hearing and speech-impaired individuals can contact the Hotline by dialing 711, the free national access number that connects to Telecommunications Relay Services (TRS).

Developed by the Council on Children and Families and Funded by the Developmental Disabilities Planning Council