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Legal Rights/Protective Services

Information regarding the discrimination against Americans with physical and mental disabilities in such areas as employment, public accommodations, and transportation. Protective Services provides protection for children who are at risk of, or are experiencing physical, sexual, or emotional abuse, or emotional or physical neglect. The NYS Justice Center ensures people with special needs are protected from abuse, neglect and mistreatment.

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Legal Rights/Protective Services

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1

10 Tips for Voters With Disabilities

The following tips from the U.S. Election Assistance Commission examine the options available to help voters with disabilities vote privately and independently.

2

411 on Disability Disclosure: A Workbook for Youth with Disabilities

This Workbook is designed for youth and adults working with them to learn about disability disclosure. This workbook helps young people make informed decisions about whether or not to disclose their disability and understand how that decision may impact their education, employment, and social lives. Based on the premise that disclosure is a very personal decision, the Workbook helps young people think about and practice disclosing their disability. The workbook does not tell a young person what to do. Rather, it helps them make informed decisions about disclosing their disability, decisions that will affect their educational, employment, and social lives.

 

3

A Comparison of ADA, IDEA, and Section 504

This fact sheet offers a comparison of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.

4

A-Z of Disabilities and Accommodations

The Job Accommodation Network (JAN) provides free consulting services for individuals with physical or intellectual limitations that affect employment. Services include one-on-one consultation about job accommodation ideas, requesting and negotiating accommodations, and rights under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and related laws. Although JAN does not help individuals find employment, JAN does provide information for job seekers.

JAN provides information on: various disabilities, impairments, and conditions; accommodations and other ADA issues; and accommodation ideas by physical limitations.

5

Abandoned Infant Protection Act

New York State’s Abandoned Infant Protection Act allows a parent to abandon a newborn baby up to 30 days of age anonymously and without fear of prosecution -- if the baby is abandoned in a safe manner.

parent is not guilty of a crime if the infant is left with an appropriate person or in a suitable location and the parent promptly notifies an appropriate person of the infant’s location.  A hospital, staffed police or fire station are examples of safe and suitable choices.

A person leaving an infant under this law is not required to give his or her name.

Click here to listen to an audio message about Abandoned Infant Protection Act Listen to audio.

6

About Family Court - Need to Know Series

Youth living in foster care have their cases heard in Family Court, a court which deals with issues of families, children, and youth. You, like many others, may have questions about Family Court, what to expect there, how to present yourself effectively and what the terms used there mean. This pamphlet was designed to help you understand Family Court. After you’ve read this pamphlet, you can talk to your caseworker or attorney regarding any questions you may have.

 

7

ADA.Gov

The ADA requires the Department of Justice to provide technical assistance to businesses, State and local governments, and individuals with rights or responsibilities under the law. The Department provides education and technical assistance through a variety of means to encourage voluntary compliance. Activities include providing direct technical assistance and guidance to the public through this ADA Website and the ADA Information Line, developing and disseminating technical assistance materials to the public, and undertaking outreach initiatives.

ADA Information Line

The Department of Justice operates a toll-free ADA Information Line to provide information and materials to the public about the requirements of the ADA.  ADA Specialists, who assist callers in understanding how the ADA applies to their situation, are available on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday from 9:30 a.m. until 5:30 p.m. (Eastern Time) and on Thursday from 12:30 p.m. until 5:30 p.m. (Eastern Time). Calls are confidential. To get answers to technical questions, obtain general ADA information, order free ADA materials, or ask about filing a complaint, please call: 800-514-0301 (voice); 800-514-0383 (TTY)

ADA Technical Assistance Materials

Copies of the Department's ADA regulations, technical assistance publications, and some videos can be obtained on this website, by calling the ADA Information Line, or writing to the address listed below. Publications are available in standard print and alternate format. Some publications are available in foreign languages.

U.S. Department of Justice
Civil Rights Division
950 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W.
Disability Rights Section - NYAV
Washington, D.C. 20530

8

Arc Fact Sheets

The Arc has compiled a series of brief, two-page fact sheets for family members, advocates, professionals, media, researchers, policymakers and others that provide an overview of a specific topic related to intellectual disability. A wide variety of topics are covered, from the causes of intellectual disability to various types of syndromes to criminal justice/victimization issues.

9

Building the Legacy: IDEA 2004

This website was created to provide a "one-stop shop" for resources related to IDEA and its implementing regulations, released on August 3, 2006.

The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) is a law ensuring services to children with disabilities throughout the nation. IDEA governs how states and public agencies provide early intervention, special education and related services to more than 6.5 million eligible infants, toddlers, children and youth with disabilities.

Infants and toddlers with disabilities (birth-2) and their families receive early intervention services under IDEA Part C. Children and youth (ages 3-21) receive special education and related services under IDEA Part B.

10

Bullying & Students with Disabilities

This publication provides information for parents and families and schools about the laws, regulations and policies of bullying and harassment in schools. 

Developed by the Council on Children and Families and Funded by the Developmental Disabilities Planning Council