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Communication of Medical Information

Communication is a cornerstone of modern medicine, where thoroughly understanding medical information can lead the way in improved patient experience. Communication can change a patient's experience drastically. If questions are not answered, uncertainty can lead to years of unjustified fear.

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Communication of Medical Information

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1

Become a Family Peer Advocate (FPA)

Family Peer Advocates are valuable professionals within the child serving system. They are uniquely qualified to work with families based on their first-hand experience as the parent/caregiver of a young person with a social, emotional, behavioral, health, or developmental disability. This experience, combined with additional Parent Empowerment (PEP) training, allows them to provide peer support to parents of children with similar challenges.

2

College: You Can Do It! Tip Sheet

This tip sheet provides helpful information to help students with disabilities prepare for college.

The document covers three phases: 

  • Preparing for college while in high school.
  • Staying in college, which requires numerous self-management skills.
  • Preparing to move beyond college and into a career.

3

Culturally Competent Care for LGBTQ Older Adults Video

This video, jointly produced by the Center for Consumer Engagement in Health Innovaton and SAGE, the nation’s largest and oldest organization serving lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender elders, looks at the unique experiences and needs of LGBTQ older adults to get at the vital importance of providers making efforts to become familiar with the diverse populations they serve, and be ready to meet consumers where they are in providing for their health care needs.

4

Early Intervention Program

The New York State Early Intervention Program (EIP) is part of the nationwide EIP. It is for infants and toddlers under three years of age who may not be making progress like other children because of a developmental delay or disability. A disability means that a child has a diagnosed physical or mental condition that may lead to developmental problems. These include, but are not limited to, autism, Down syndrome, motor disorders, or vision and hearing problems. A developmental delay means a child is behind in some area of development, such as growth, learning and thinking, or communicating.

The first step is your child's referral to the EIP in the county where you live. All counties in New York State (NYS) and New York City have an EIP. Children who may need services must first be referred to the EIP. Parents can refer their own child to the EIP if they have a concern about their child's development. In NYS, certain professionals are required to refer children to the EIP if a developmental problem is suspected. After referral, your child will be evaluated by qualified professionals. Your county EIP or the New York City EIP will help you get services if your child is found to be eligible. Health insurance, including private insurance and Medicaid, may be used to pay for early intervention services. EIP services must be provided at no cost to you and will not affect your insurance coverage.

View Early Intervention Programs using our MSNavigator Mapping Tool.

 

5

Frequently Asked Questions about Special Education

This webpage answers many frequently asked questions regarding special education issues - accommodations and modifications, advocacy, damages, discipline, due process hearings, progress, reading, parent-school relations, high-stakes testing, retention, No Child Left Behind, and other topics. You will find answers to many of your questions here.

6

Medicaid Health Homes

A "Health Home" is not a physical place; it is a group of health care and service providers working together to make sure you get the care and services you need to stay healthy. Once you are enrolled in a Health Home, you will have a care manager that works with you to develop a care plan. A care plan maps out the services you need, to put you on the road to better health. Some of the services may include:

  • Connecting to health care providers,
  • Connecting to mental health and substance abuse providers,
  • Connecting to needed medications,
  • Help with housing,
  • Social services (such as food, benefits, and transportation) or,
  • Other community programs that can support and assist you.

7

National Disability Navigator Resource Collaborative (NDNRC)

This project develops disability-content materials, including a technical assistance guide; a dedicated website with URL that will include all materials as well as state-specific information, resources, and experiences; provides on-going TA to navigators via typical TA methods (e.g. webinars, topic-specific fact sheets, short issue briefs, newsletters, list serves); and discusses the feasibility of providing “hands-on” technical assistance to navigators and/or their host organizations.

8

NY Connects

NY Connects provides information and assistance related to long-term services and supports in New York State for people of all ages or with any type of disability. NY Connects uses a searchable directory for programs, providers, and services in your area.

NY Connects staff can help link you to long-term services and supports, such as home care, transportation and meals. The goal is to help individuals live as independently as possible while meeting their medical, social and functional needs that arise from aging or disability. This program helps individuals, families, caregivers, and professionals.

Contact your local office to:

  • Get information by phone, online, or in person.
  • Connect to long-term services and supports regardless of diagnosis, age or how you will pay for services.
  • Receive guidance and coordination as you go through assessment and eligibility processes.
  • Help with completing applications and enrollment in public assistance benefits, such as Medicaid.
  • Or for any additional information.

9

NYS Foster Parent Manual

This manual was designed for foster parents to use in their day-to-day life with children and youth in their care. It provides practical information on topics like medical care, payments, and the role of court and also provides guidance on areas like welcoming a child, discipline, and parent visits. Throughout the manual, emphasis is placed on the role of foster parents working together with caseworkers and birth parents to help achieve permanency.

10

Preparing Your Child/Young Adult for Work

This fact sheet defines disability disclosure and discusses the advantages and disadvantages for young adults disclosing their disability to their employer.

Developed by the Council on Children and Families and Funded by the Developmental Disabilities Planning Council