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Skilled Nursing

Skilled nursing is a term that refers to a patient's need of care or treatment that can only be done by licensed nurses. Examples of skilled nursing needs include complex wound dressings, rehabilitation, tube feedings, or rapidly changing health status.

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Skilled Nursing

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1

2-1-1/3-1-1

2-1-1 (and 3-1-1 in New York City) are easy-to-remember numbers that helps people cut through what can be a confusing and overwhelming maze of information and resources.

2-1-1 (and 3-1-1 in New York City) helps people assess their needs and links them directly to the resources that will help. Whether you are looking for essential services, seeking volunteer opportunities or starting a small business, 2-1-1 (and 3-1-1 in New York City) is there to help.

2

29-I Health Facility (Voluntary Foster Care Agency Transition)

Voluntary Foster Care Agencies (VFCAs) must be licensed for the provision of limited health-related services to contract and bill Medicaid Managed Care Plans and comply with Corporate Practice of Medicine standards. To be licensed as a VFCA Health Facility, the foster care agency must apply to the NYS Office of Children and Family Services and the NYS Department of Health and include limited health-related services to be provided, the location and physical description of the physical plant, and other required information.

3

Culturally Competent Care for LGBTQ Older Adults Video

This video, jointly produced by the Center for Consumer Engagement in Health Innovaton and SAGE, the nation’s largest and oldest organization serving lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender elders, looks at the unique experiences and needs of LGBTQ older adults to get at the vital importance of providers making efforts to become familiar with the diverse populations they serve, and be ready to meet consumers where they are in providing for their health care needs.

4

Disability Provider Directory

The NYS Office For People With Developmental Disabilities and its associated voluntary agencies offer many services to individuals and their families. This interactive directory lists services by service type and location.

5

Early Intervention Program

The New York State Early Intervention Program (EIP) is part of the nationwide EIP. It is for infants and toddlers under three years of age who may not be making progress like other children because of a developmental delay or disability. A disability means that a child has a diagnosed physical or mental condition that may lead to developmental problems. These include, but are not limited to, autism, Down syndrome, motor disorders, or vision and hearing problems. A developmental delay means a child is behind in some area of development, such as growth, learning and thinking, or communicating.

The first step is your child's referral to the EIP in the county where you live. All counties in New York State (NYS) and New York City have an EIP. Children who may need services must first be referred to the EIP. Parents can refer their own child to the EIP if they have a concern about their child's development. In NYS, certain professionals are required to refer children to the EIP if a developmental problem is suspected. After referral, your child will be evaluated by qualified professionals. Your county EIP or the New York City EIP will help you get services if your child is found to be eligible. Health insurance, including private insurance and Medicaid, may be used to pay for early intervention services. EIP services must be provided at no cost to you and will not affect your insurance coverage.

View Early Intervention Programs using our MSNavigator Mapping Tool.

 

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Interagency Coordination and Case Resolution Bureau

The Hard to Place/Hard to Serve Unit works to assist caregivers and individuals in receiving the most appropriate community-based or residential services; minimize delays in arranging services or placements; and resolves barriers that impede timely service delivery or placement. 

The Hard to Place/Hard to Serve Unit becomes involved ONLY after all program options and dispute resolution procedures have been exhausted at the local and regional levels, or if a caregiver feels their child's needs are not being met by existing systems. 

How to Make a Referral

The agent making a referral on behalf of a child must provide the Council with the following:

  • a completed Hard to Place Unit Intake Form and a signed Release of Information Form;
  • a description of the barriers encountered in attempting to provide appropriate services or placement;
  • a record of the efforts that have been made by the referral source or others to secure services and/or placements for the child; and
  • background information on the child's special needs.

A referral containing all of the information mentioned above may be submitted to:

Regina Canuso, Coordinator, Hard-to-Place/Hard-to-Serve Unit 

Kathleen Rivers, Assistant Coordinator, Hard-to-Place/Hard-to-Serve Unit

Interagency Coordination and Case Resolution Bureau
NYS Council on Children and Families
52 Washington Street
West Building, Suite 99
Rensselaer, NY 12144

Telephone: 518-473-3652
Fax: 518-473-2570
e-mail: regina.canuso@ccf.ny.gov; kathleen.rivers@ccf.ny.gov

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Medicaid Hotlines

Medicaid is a health care program that assists low-income families or individuals with disabilities pay for long-term medical and custodial care costs. Medicaid is a joint program, funded primarily by the federal government and run at the state level, where coverage may vary.

These hotlines include - a general Medicaid Helpline; Medicaid Managed Care; and the Medicaid Fraud Hotlines as well as numbers for New York City.

8

Nursing Home Complaint Hotline

The NYS Department of Health, Nursing Homes and Intermediate Care Facilities for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities (ICF/IID) Surveillance is responsible for investigating complaints and incidents for nursing homes in New York State, which are related to State and/or Federal regulatory violation. A complaint against a nursing home should be submitted in writing by the complainant.

The Nursing Home Complaint Form is available online to submit your complaint against a nursing home.

If you are unable to submit your complaint by using the Nursing Home Complaint Form, then you may contact the Nursing Home Complaint hotline (1-888-201-4563) which can be called 24 hours per day, seven days per week. The hotline is manned by Nursing Homes and ICF/IID Surveillance staff from 8:30 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. Monday through Friday. A voicemail message may be left during non-business hours.

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Statewide School Health Services Center

The New York Statewide School Health Services Center is a contracted Center of the NYS Education Department that provides technical assistance, resources and professional development focused on student health and wellness initiatives.

This website provides legal information related to school health and nutrition, as well specific information on medication administration, field trips, confidentiality - really all aspects of school-related health management.

Developed by the Council on Children and Families and Funded by the Developmental Disabilities Planning Council