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Information and Referral

Information and referral resources work to answers to questions and provide supportive information to those seeking assistance.

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Information and Referral

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1

2-1-1/3-1-1

2-1-1 (and 3-1-1 in New York City) are easy-to-remember numbers that helps people cut through what can be a confusing and overwhelming maze of information and resources.

2-1-1 (and 3-1-1 in New York City) helps people assess their needs and links them directly to the resources that will help. Whether you are looking for essential services, seeking volunteer opportunities or starting a small business, 2-1-1 (and 3-1-1 in New York City) is there to help.

2

511NY TransLinks (Paratransit Providers)

The NYS DOT TransLinks search engine offers the interactive map or use drop-down boxes for selections and search for available public paratransit in New York State. 

3

A-Z of Disabilities and Accommodations

The Job Accommodation Network (JAN) provides free consulting services for individuals with physical or intellectual limitations that affect employment. Services include one-on-one consultation about job accommodation ideas, requesting and negotiating accommodations, and rights under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and related laws. Although JAN does not help individuals find employment, JAN does provide information for job seekers.

JAN provides information on: various disabilities, impairments, and conditions; accommodations and other ADA issues; and accommodation ideas by physical limitations.

4

About Autism and Other Autism Resources

The Autistic Self Advocacy Network is a nonprofit organization run by and for autistic people. The About Autism page lists common characteristics of autism spectrum disorder. This website also has a catalog of publications serving the cross-disability community.

5

ADA, Section 504 & Postsecondary Education

It is important that students and their advocates become knowledgeable about their rights and responsibilities in postsecondary education. Although protections exist, the students have considerably more responsibility in postsecondary education to request their own accommodations. This responsibility is ongoing. For many students with disabilities, good self-advocacy skills are the key to success, and knowing their rights is one essential element of effective self-advocacy.

6

ADA.Gov

The ADA requires the Department of Justice to provide technical assistance to businesses, State and local governments, and individuals with rights or responsibilities under the law. The Department provides education and technical assistance through a variety of means to encourage voluntary compliance. Activities include providing direct technical assistance and guidance to the public through this ADA Website and the ADA Information Line, developing and disseminating technical assistance materials to the public, and undertaking outreach initiatives.

ADA Information Line

The Department of Justice operates a toll-free ADA Information Line to provide information and materials to the public about the requirements of the ADA.  ADA Specialists, who assist callers in understanding how the ADA applies to their situation, are available on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday from 9:30 a.m. until 5:30 p.m. (Eastern Time) and on Thursday from 12:30 p.m. until 5:30 p.m. (Eastern Time). Calls are confidential. To get answers to technical questions, obtain general ADA information, order free ADA materials, or ask about filing a complaint, please call: 800-514-0301 (voice); 800-514-0383 (TTY)

ADA Technical Assistance Materials

Copies of the Department's ADA regulations, technical assistance publications, and some videos can be obtained on this website, by calling the ADA Information Line, or writing to the address listed below. Publications are available in standard print and alternate format. Some publications are available in foreign languages.

U.S. Department of Justice
Civil Rights Division
950 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W.
Disability Rights Section - NYAV
Washington, D.C. 20530

7

Addiction Recovery Resources

This website provides links to support groups and resources for individuals in recovery, as well as information for their family and friends. Participation in these recovery programs is free.

8

Assistive Technology (TRAID) Program

The Assistive Technology Exchange in New England & New York was established to help facilitate equipment exchanges between individuals. Items are posted on its getATstuff website. The Justice Center supports 12 Regional TRAID Centers (RTCs), where staff provides information, training, device demonstration, device reuse, device exchange, and device loans. TRAID staff also provides technical assistance and advocacy on how to obtain and use assistive technology services and devices. 

The TRAID Program, in collaboration with the NYS Department of Health Early Intervention Program, provides partial funding to the RTCs for device loan libraries for infants and toddlers with disabilities, ages birth to three, and their families.

9

Become a Family Peer Advocate (FPA)

Family Peer Advocates are valuable professionals within the child serving system. They are uniquely qualified to work with families based on their first-hand experience as the parent/caregiver of a young person with a social, emotional, behavioral, health, or developmental disability. This experience, combined with additional Parent Empowerment (PEP) training, allows them to provide peer support to parents of children with similar challenges.

10

Become a Youth Peer Advocate (YPA)

Are you a young person who is between the ages of 18 and 30 years old with first-hand experience with mental health, special education, or foster care services? Are you curious about ways you could help a younger person who is facing some of the same challenges you faced?

If so, consider becoming a Youth Peer Advocate (YPA). Learn more about how you can use your own experience with recovery to make a positive impact in another young person’s life.

Developed by the Council on Children and Families and Funded by the Developmental Disabilities Planning Council