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General Support for Families

General support for families includes integrated network of community-based resources and services that strengthen and support families.

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General Support for Families

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1

2-1-1/3-1-1

2-1-1 (and 3-1-1 in New York City) are easy-to-remember numbers that helps people cut through what can be a confusing and overwhelming maze of information and resources.

2-1-1 (and 3-1-1 in New York City) helps people assess their needs and links them directly to the resources that will help. Whether you are looking for essential services, seeking volunteer opportunities or starting a small business, 2-1-1 (and 3-1-1 in New York City) is there to help.

2

ACCESS NYC

Find help in NYC with food, money, housing, work and more on ACCESS NYC. There are over 30 programs you or your family may be eligible for regardless of immigration status and even if you’re already receiving benefits or have a job.

3

Addiction Recovery Resources

This website provides links to support groups and resources for individuals in recovery, as well as information for their family and friends. Participation in these recovery programs is free.

4

Alcohol Rehab Guide

The Alcohol Rehab Guide is an online resource created to help people struggling with an alcohol addiction find treatment when they need it most. The team at ARG is made up of recovering addicts and industry professionals who are dedicated to helping everyone find hope in recovery.

ARG provides life-saving information and guidance to help people suffering from alcoholism find and stay in recovery.

5

Anxiety and Depression Association of America

This website provides helpful information for caregivers for the prevention, treatment and cure of anxiety and mood disorders, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD), and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). It also provides helpful information on school avoidance and many other related topics.

6

Autism Videos for Parents

The videos in this gallery are a  mix of English and Spanish and provide subtitles in both languages. The videos show parents and discuss the trauma of discovering their children were different and they discuss the struggles they have faced and how they have managed and overcome them.

7

Become a Family Peer Advocate (FPA)

Family Peer Advocates are valuable professionals within the child serving system. They are uniquely qualified to work with families based on their first-hand experience as the parent/caregiver of a young person with a social, emotional, behavioral, health, or developmental disability. This experience, combined with additional Parent Empowerment (PEP) training, allows them to provide peer support to parents of children with similar challenges.

8

Become a Youth Peer Advocate (YPA)

Are you a young person who is between the ages of 18 and 30 years old with first-hand experience with mental health, special education, or foster care services? Are you curious about ways you could help a younger person who is facing some of the same challenges you faced?

If so, consider becoming a Youth Peer Advocate (YPA). Learn more about how you can use your own experience with recovery to make a positive impact in another young person’s life.

9

Building a School Responder Model

The School Responder Model (SRM) is a response to school infractions that aims to address behavioral health needs and reduce the likelihood of juvenile justice involvement. This interactive web application provides data and practical activities to address behavioral health issues.

10

Bureau of Adult Services (BAS) Adult Protective Services

The NYS Office of Children and Family Services, through its Bureau of Adult Services, is responsible for the oversight of Protective Services for Adults (PSA) and other adult services provided through the local departments of social services, and local operations relative to Family-Type Homes for Adults (FTHA).

The Bureau provides technical assistance to adult services staff of local districts; conducts informal case reviews; participates in audits; reviews consolidated services plans; conducts complaint investigations; and develops public education, training, and interagency initiatives.

This web site is designed to provide information on Protective Services for Adults and to educate the general public on recognizing and responding to adult abuse, neglect and financial exploitation issues.

Developed by the Council on Children and Families and Funded by the Developmental Disabilities Planning Council