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Transition Planning

Transition planning is a process that brings together a person and those individuals directly involved in helping the person prepare to enter into adulthood. Transition plans are are designed to ensure that the person will be provided the necessary skills and services to make a smooth transition into adult life with as little interruption as possible.

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Transition Planning

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1

ABLE Accounts: 10 Things You Should Know

ABLE Accounts are tax-advantaged savings accounts for individuals with disabilities and their families. The beneficiary of the account is the account owner, and income earned by the accounts will not be taxed. Contributions to the account made by any person (the account beneficiary, family and friends) will be made using post-taxed dollars and will not be tax deductible, although some states may allow for state income tax deductions for contribution made to an ABLE account.

2

Accessing Home and Community-Based Services: A Guide for Self-Advocates

Accessing Home and Community-Based Services: A Guide for Self Advocates is a tool designed to help people with disabilities, families, and friends find and use available resources. This may include family and friends, community-based services, state funded waivers and programs, and other resources to help empower people with disabilities to live as independently as possible and make our own choices about what we need. It is a tool to inform about various resources and how to access them. It is also a reference about resources that, although you may not need or want them now, you can use in the future.

3

ADA, Section 504 & Postsecondary Education

It is important that students and their advocates become knowledgeable about their rights and responsibilities in postsecondary education. Although protections exist, the students have considerably more responsibility in postsecondary education to request their own accommodations. This responsibility is ongoing. For many students with disabilities, good self-advocacy skills are the key to success, and knowing their rights is one essential element of effective self-advocacy.

4

Assertive Community Treatment (ACT)

Youth Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) is a program designed to address the significant needs of children ages 10 up to 21, who are at risk of entering, or returning home from high intensity services, such as inpatient settings or residential services, through the use of a multi-disciplinary team. Children with significant psychiatric needs, who are at risk of institutional level of care, require intensive interventions in order to adequately support the child and family’s complex needs, to avoid high end services or facilitate and support a successful transition back to community. Youth ACT serves as a critical component in the children’s continuum of care.

5

Become a Family Peer Advocate (FPA)

Family Peer Advocates are valuable professionals within the child serving system. They are uniquely qualified to work with families based on their first-hand experience as the parent/caregiver of a young person with a social, emotional, behavioral, health, or developmental disability. This experience, combined with additional Parent Empowerment (PEP) training, allows them to provide peer support to parents of children with similar challenges.

6

Become a Youth Peer Advocate (YPA)

Are you a young person who is between the ages of 18 and 30 years old with first-hand experience with mental health, special education, or foster care services? Are you curious about ways you could help a younger person who is facing some of the same challenges you faced?

If so, consider becoming a Youth Peer Advocate (YPA). Learn more about how you can use your own experience with recovery to make a positive impact in another young person’s life.

7

Bravehearts - Motivating Others through Voices of Experiences (M.O.V.E.) NY

The mission of the Bravehearts is to empower young adults touched by the child welfare system to become active and authentic leaders in their own lives as they transition into adulthood.

Located in Westchester County, Bravehearts M.O.V.E. New York is the chapter-lead for the state and an authentic youth-led non-profit. They work to improve services and systems that support positive growth and development by uniting the voices of individuals who have lived experience in various systems including mental health, juvenile justice, education and child welfare.

A Braveheart is any young adult, aged 14-26 who has overcome adversity, persevered through difficult times and come out as a stronger and wiser version of themselves.

8

Casey Life Sills (CLS) Assessment Tool

The Casey Life Skills (CLS) tool is a tool for youth to build their own personal checklist of skills and strengths. It shows them what they know already and what is possible for them to learn in the future. A case worker or mentor needs to help them create a free account.

9

Children's Home and Community Based Services (CHCBS)

Children's Home and Community Based Services are for children and youth (under age 21) who:

  1. Are enrolled or eligible to enroll in Medicaid - Some children/youth may be eligible for Medicaid if they are eligible for Children’s HCBS. If a child/youth does not have Medicaid and you think they may be eligible for HCBS, call C-YES at 1-833-333-2937
  2. Need extra care at home or in the community to avoid the need for long-term inpatient care
  3. Are in a higher level of care and would be able to stay at home with extra support

The NYS Office of Mental Health created multiple HSBC brochures and Q&A.

10

College - You Can Do It!

In this video presentation, students with disabilities and staff share advice for success in college. It is designed for high school students with disabilities preparing for college.

Developed by the Council on Children and Families and Funded by the Developmental Disabilities Planning Council