Select language
 
13

Results

Evaluations

Mental health assessments are performed to screen for mental health disorders such as depression or anxiety. They can also be used to help diagnose neurological pathology, such as Alzheimer’s disease. A mental health assessment may be indicated if a person is having difficulty at work, school, or in social situations. For example, a diagnosis of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) or a personality disorder may begin with a mental health assessment as part of their discovery.

Results shown for:
Evaluations

Refine your search results

1

A Parent's Guide to Special Education in NYS for Children 3-21

This guide contains comprehensive information on the special education process in New York State, beginning with the initial referral for special education services. Special education means specially designed individualized or group instruction or special services or programs to meet the unique needs of students with disabilities. Special education services and programs are provided at no cost to the parent. 

2

Article 16 Clinic

The Shield Institute's Article 16 Clinic provides diagnostic, evaluation and clinical services for children and adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and intellectual/developmental disabilities. Psychological, social work, speech, occupational and physical therapy, rehabilitative counseling and nutritional counseling are provided individually and/or in group settings. Specialty services include augmentative communication evaluation and treatment, eating and swallowing evaluation and treatment and psycho-sexual assessment and treatment. All services are provided by our licensed and experienced staff.

Learn more about the Shield Institute's Article 16 Clinic.

3

Building the Legacy: IDEA 2004

This website was created to provide a "one-stop shop" for resources related to IDEA and its implementing regulations, released on August 3, 2006.

The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) is a law ensuring services to children with disabilities throughout the nation. IDEA governs how states and public agencies provide early intervention, special education and related services to more than 6.5 million eligible infants, toddlers, children and youth with disabilities.

Infants and toddlers with disabilities (birth-2) and their families receive early intervention services under IDEA Part C. Children and youth (ages 3-21) receive special education and related services under IDEA Part B.

4

Child Mind Institute

The Child Mind Institute contains a wide variety of useful information resources for families and educators. The site explores concerns and challenges faced by parents, family members and educators. Learn how to effectively respond to emotional, behavioral and learning challenges. This website also contains many personal story videos.

Th Child Mind Institute is available online or in person (in New York City), offering evaluations, treatment and neuropsychological testing for children, teens and young adults.

5

Dual Diagnosis - A Guide for Caregivers

This guidebook gives caregivers the tools they need to understand how mental illness might look in a person with a developmental disability, and information on what to do and where to go for help. It was written in order to help caregivers to partner with health care providers. This guidebook was originally written in 2011 and was revised in 2015. It was created for the New York State Institute for Health Transition Training with grant support from the New York State Developmental Disabilities Planning Council.

6

Early Intervention Program

The New York State Early Intervention Program (EIP) is part of the nationwide EIP. It is for infants and toddlers under three years of age who may not be making progress like other children because of a developmental delay or disability. A disability means that a child has a diagnosed physical or mental condition that may lead to developmental problems. These include, but are not limited to, autism, Down syndrome, motor disorders, or vision and hearing problems. A developmental delay means a child is behind in some area of development, such as growth, learning and thinking, or communicating.

The first step is your child's referral to the EIP in the county where you live. All counties in New York State (NYS) and New York City have an EIP. Children who may need services must first be referred to the EIP. Parents can refer their own child to the EIP if they have a concern about their child's development. In NYS, certain professionals are required to refer children to the EIP if a developmental problem is suspected. After referral, your child will be evaluated by qualified professionals. Your county EIP or the New York City EIP will help you get services if your child is found to be eligible. Health insurance, including private insurance and Medicaid, may be used to pay for early intervention services. EIP services must be provided at no cost to you and will not affect your insurance coverage.

View Early Intervention Programs using our MSNavigator Mapping Tool.

 

7

Evaluation Basics

This web page provides comprehensive information about the evaluation process. Some of the topics include:

  • Understanding the Full Evaluation Process
  • 6 Steps for Requesting a School Evaluation
  • The Evaluation Process: What to Expect
  • FAQs about Evaluations for Learning and Attention Issues
  • At a Glance: Who's on the Evaluation Team at Your Child's School
  • 7 Steps to take Before Requesting a Formal Evaluation
  • Is a Functional Assessment the Same thing as a Formal Evaluation? and more...

8

Everything You Need to Know About OPWDD Eligibility

This series of videos gives an introduction to the OPWDD eligibility process, and process for obtaining services. 

  • What is OPWDD, where to start and what is eligibility? Basic introduction to accessing services for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities in New York. Introduces Office for People with Developmental Disabilities (OPWDD) and the concept of eligibility for OPWDD funded services.
  • What is needed to apply for OPWDD eligibility? Discusses evaluations required for applying for eligibility and steps required for submitting paperwork to the Office for People with Developmental Disabilities (OPWDD).

  • Eligibility attained, what now? Once a person has established eligibility, what are the next steps? How do you access services? What services are there?

9

Find a Behavioral Health Provider

Use this mental health online provider directory to find a behavioral health provider in New York State.

10

Hillside Outpatient Clinic

Provides an array of mental health services to children, adolescents and adults. Services include individual/family therapy, crisis intervention, psychiatric evaluations, pharmacotherapy and outreach and linkage to community resources. Services are designed to address mental health symptoms and improve daily functioning for the person in care.  All counseling services are provided by licensed professionals including social workers, mental health counselors, marriage and family therapists, and creative arts therapists.

Developed by the Council on Children and Families and Funded by the Developmental Disabilities Planning Council