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Family/School Communication

The development of positive educational outcomes for children and youth often depends on how well schools and caregivers communicate with each other. This is especially important for children and youth with special needs.

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Family/School Communication

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1

9 Tips to Improve Your Communication Skills

Communication is an essential part of work and home life. Understanding how to be a good communicator can be an important productivity tool, one that’s frequently neglected. Poor communication can often have disastrous results; lost time, injured feelings, frustration, ineffective meetings, unproductive teamwork, resulting in a general lack of career advancement and goal achievement. To become effective communicators we need to be aware of a few fundamental tips we can use in our work and life interactions. Regardless of the situation, the same rules apply.

2

A Parent's Guide to Special Education in NYS for Children 3-21

This guide contains comprehensive information on the special education process in New York State, beginning with the initial referral for special education services. Special education means specially designed individualized or group instruction or special services or programs to meet the unique needs of students with disabilities. Special education services and programs are provided at no cost to the parent. 

3

Become a Family Peer Advocate (FPA)

Family Peer Advocates are valuable professionals within the child serving system. They are uniquely qualified to work with families based on their first-hand experience as the parent/caregiver of a young person with a social, emotional, behavioral, health, or developmental disability. This experience, combined with additional Parent Empowerment (PEP) training, allows them to provide peer support to parents of children with similar challenges.

4

Bullying & Students with Disabilities

This publication provides information for parents and families and schools about the laws, regulations and policies of bullying and harassment in schools. 

5

Collaborative and Proactive Solutions

Whether you're a parent or teacher...whether a child is behaviorally challenging or not...collaboration is the key to improved relationships, better communication, and solving problems. This website contains a ton of free resources to help you move in that direction. The goals of this website is to help to ensure that kids everywhere are treated in ways that are compassionate, informed, and effective.

6

Early Childhood Transition Process

This guide provides information to help families of children with special needs prepare for smooth and effective transtions. It includes general information on the rights and responsibilities of families as well as eligibility under IDEA and Settings for Preschool, School Registration Requirements, Program Options for 4-year-olds and Areas of Development.

7

Every Student Present Website

This website provides a multitude of information to help children succeed in schools. It addresses topics like:

and MUCH more!

Every Student Present is a public awareness intended to help families, school leaders and communities understand the importance of consistent school attendance and the impact of absences of children's learning, especially young students. The goals of the campaign are to promote awareness of chronic absence and to build capacity among schools, families and communities to reduce it.

There is also an entire section of the website with information and resources for educators and community coalitions.

8

Frequently Asked Questions about Special Education

This webpage answers many frequently asked questions regarding special education issues - accommodations and modifications, advocacy, damages, discipline, due process hearings, progress, reading, parent-school relations, high-stakes testing, retention, No Child Left Behind, and other topics. You will find answers to many of your questions here.

9

Getting Help for Struggling Students

This tip sheet highlights a variety of resources available to students who need help with school. It includes information on Supplemental Educational Services (SES); Academic Intervention Services (AIS); P-3 Letters; and private tutoring programs.

10

Graduation Requirements for Students with Disabilities

This page provides information on both high school diploma and non-diploma exiting credential options available to New York State students with disabilities. Information is provided on the course work, credit and assessment requirements students must successfully complete to earn a Regents or local high school diploma, including the various safety net options available to assist students with disabilities to earn a local diploma. Requirements, model forms, guidance, and questions and answers for the Skills and Achievement Commencement Credential and the New York State Career Development and Occupational Studies Commencement Credential are also provided.

Developed by the Council on Children and Families and Funded by the Developmental Disabilities Planning Council