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Addictions (Other than Alcohol and Substance Abuse)

Addictions are characterized by an inability to consistently abstain, impairment in behavioral control, craving, diminished recognition of significant problems with one’s behaviors and interpersonal relationships, and a dysfunctional emotional response. Like other chronic diseases, addiction often involves cycles of relapse and remission. Without treatment or engagement in recovery activities, addiction is progressive and can result in disability.

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Addictions (Other than Alcohol and Substance Abuse)

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1

2-1-1/3-1-1

2-1-1 (and 3-1-1 in New York City) are easy-to-remember numbers that helps people cut through what can be a confusing and overwhelming maze of information and resources.

2-1-1 (and 3-1-1 in New York City) helps people assess their needs and links them directly to the resources that will help. Whether you are looking for essential services, seeking volunteer opportunities or starting a small business, 2-1-1 (and 3-1-1 in New York City) is there to help.

2

Addiction Recovery Resources

This website provides links to support groups and resources for individuals in recovery, as well as information for their family and friends. Participation in these recovery programs is free.

3

Anxiety and Depression Association of America

This website provides helpful information for caregivers for the prevention, treatment and cure of anxiety and mood disorders, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD), and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). It also provides helpful information on school avoidance and many other related topics.

4

Become a Youth Peer Advocate (YPA)

Are you a young person who is between the ages of 18 and 30 years old with first-hand experience with mental health, special education, or foster care services? Are you curious about ways you could help a younger person who is facing some of the same challenges you faced?

If so, consider becoming a Youth Peer Advocate (YPA). Learn more about how you can use your own experience with recovery to make a positive impact in another young person’s life.

5

Behavioral Health Treatment Services Locator Map

The SAMHSA Behavioral Health Treatment Locator Map provides location and contact information for the following issues:

  • Substance Abuse
  • Mental Health
  • Substance Abuse & Mental Health
  • Health Care Centers
  • Veteran's Affairs

This map allows users to filter by location, distance and type of program.

6

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website provides a plethora of credible information on all aspects of protecting and improving quality health and wellness initiatives.

7

Coming Home: Transitioning Back Into the Community - A Resources Directory

A New York City resource directory for court-involved youth leaving detention and returning to the community. The goal of this publication is to provide resources for young people in order to create working, engaged and responsible adults who can contribute to the community.

8

Friends of Recovery New York

Friends of Recovery - New York is a statewide coalition of people in recovery from addiction. The Friends of Recovery - New York community includes people in recovery, their families, friends and allies. Members of Friends of Recovery - New York come together from across New York State to ensure that any person struggling with addiction has the opportunity to recover and reclaim life as a member of society.

9

Gamblers Anonymous Hotlines

GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS is a fellowship of men and women who share their experience, strength and hope with each other that they may solve their common problem and help others to recover from a gambling problem.

The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop gambling. There are no dues or fees for Gamblers Anonymous membership; they are self-supporting through members contributions. Gamblers Anonymous is not allied with any sect, denomination, politics, organization or institution; does not wish to engage in any controversy; neither endorses nor opposes any cause. Their primary purpose is to stop gambling and to help other compulsive gamblers do the same.

10

Interagency Coordination and Case Resolution Bureau

The Hard to Place/Hard to Serve Unit works to assist caregivers and individuals in receiving the most appropriate community-based or residential services; minimize delays in arranging services or placements; and resolves barriers that impede timely service delivery or placement. 

The Hard to Place/Hard to Serve Unit becomes involved ONLY after all program options and dispute resolution procedures have been exhausted at the local and regional levels, or if a caregiver feels their child's needs are not being met by existing systems. 

How to Make a Referral

The agent making a referral on behalf of a child must provide the Council with the following:

  • a completed Hard to Place Unit Intake Form and a signed Release of Information Form;
  • a description of the barriers encountered in attempting to provide appropriate services or placement;
  • a record of the efforts that have been made by the referral source or others to secure services and/or placements for the child; and
  • background information on the child's special needs.

A referral containing all of the information mentioned above may be submitted to:

Regina Canuso, Coordinator, Hard-to-Place/Hard-to-Serve Unit 

Kathleen Rivers, Assistant Coordinator, Hard-to-Place/Hard-to-Serve Unit

Interagency Coordination and Case Resolution Bureau
NYS Council on Children and Families
52 Washington Street
West Building, Suite 99
Rensselaer, NY 12144

Telephone: 518-473-3652
Fax: 518-473-2570
e-mail: regina.canuso@ccf.ny.gov; kathleen.rivers@ccf.ny.gov

Developed by the Council on Children and Families and Funded by the Developmental Disabilities Planning Council