Select language
 
10

Results

Eating Disorders

Eating Disorders are characterized by a compulsive obsession with food or weight and an inability to accurately perceive one's physical appearance in which the individual may compulsively overeat, engage in eating binges which may or may not be followed by purging, refuse to eat or otherwise use food or the process of eating or not eating in a self-destructive manner.

Results shown for:
Eating Disorders

Refine your search results

1

2-1-1/3-1-1

2-1-1 (and 3-1-1 in New York City) are easy-to-remember numbers that helps people cut through what can be a confusing and overwhelming maze of information and resources.

2-1-1 (and 3-1-1 in New York City) helps people assess their needs and links them directly to the resources that will help. Whether you are looking for essential services, seeking volunteer opportunities or starting a small business, 2-1-1 (and 3-1-1 in New York City) is there to help.

2

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website provides a plethora of credible information on all aspects of protecting and improving quality health and wellness initiatives.

3

Find a Behavioral Health Provider

Use this mental health online provider directory to find a behavioral health provider in New York State.

4

Find Treatment for Addiction

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) collects information on thousands of state-licensed providers who specialize in treating substance use disorders, addiction, and mental illness. Use this website to find a treatment facility near you.

5

Growing Up Healthy Hotline

The Department of Health operates the Growing Up Healthy Hotline, which provides information about health care, nutrition and other health and human services. The hotline provides information and referral 24 hours/day, seven days a week in English and Spanish and other languages.

6

Interagency Coordination and Case Resolution Bureau

The Hard to Place/Hard to Serve Unit works to assist caregivers and individuals in receiving the most appropriate community-based or residential services; minimize delays in arranging services or placements; and resolves barriers that impede timely service delivery or placement. 

The Hard to Place/Hard to Serve Unit becomes involved ONLY after all program options and dispute resolution procedures have been exhausted at the local and regional levels, or if a caregiver feels their child's needs are not being met by existing systems. 

How to Make a Referral

The agent making a referral on behalf of a child must provide the Council with the following:

  • a completed Hard to Place Unit Intake Form and a signed Release of Information Form;
  • a description of the barriers encountered in attempting to provide appropriate services or placement;
  • a record of the efforts that have been made by the referral source or others to secure services and/or placements for the child; and
  • background information on the child's special needs.

A referral containing all of the information mentioned above may be submitted to:

Regina Canuso, Coordinator, Hard-to-Place/Hard-to-Serve Unit 

Kathleen Rivers, Assistant Coordinator, Hard-to-Place/Hard-to-Serve Unit

Interagency Coordination and Case Resolution Bureau
NYS Council on Children and Families
52 Washington Street
West Building, Suite 99
Rensselaer, NY 12144

Telephone: 518-473-3652
Fax: 518-473-2570
e-mail: regina.canuso@ccf.ny.gov; kathleen.rivers@ccf.ny.gov

7

Mental Health Resources for College Students

Although this resource is provides college students and young people with quality information on maintaining good mental health and identifying mental health issues, it is not meant to take the place of professional advice from a qualified mental health specialist. Some of the most common mental health issues facing college students include: Depression; Anxiety; Suicide; Bipolar Disorder; Eating Disorders; Addiction; Self-harm; and Struggles with Identity.

8

National Eating Disorders Helpline

In addition to the resources available the National Eating Disorders (NEDA) website, NEDA’s Information and Referral Helpline volunteers are available to help you in assessing options for yourself or a loved one who may be struggling with an eating disorder. Helpline volunteers have extensive training to prepare them to be able to help you find information, treatment and support options.

9

Parent Guides on Social and Emotional Development

The NYS Office of Mental Health developed a set of parent guides to help parents better understand their child's social emotional development from ages 1 - 18. These guides provide information on what to expect, what you can do, when to be concerned and how to get help.

10

Resource Directory for Children and Young Adults with Special Health Care Needs

This resource directory is for the families of children and young adults who have a serious illness or long-lasting condition for which they need extra health care and support services. Children and young adults with special health care needs might have a serious or long-lasting:

  • Physical condition
  • Intellectual or developmental disability or
  • Behavioral or emotional condition.

Developed by the Council on Children and Families and Funded by the Developmental Disabilities Planning Council