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Withdrawal/Isolation/Sadness

Social withdrawal is avoiding people and activities you would usually enjoy; for some people, this can progress to a point of social isolation, where you may even want to avoid contact with family and close friends and just be by yourself most of the time. Social isolation is potentially both a cause and a symptom of emotional or psychological challenges.

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Withdrawal/Isolation/Sadness

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1

2-1-1/3-1-1

2-1-1 (and 3-1-1 in New York City) are easy-to-remember numbers that helps people cut through what can be a confusing and overwhelming maze of information and resources.

2-1-1 (and 3-1-1 in New York City) helps people assess their needs and links them directly to the resources that will help. Whether you are looking for essential services, seeking volunteer opportunities or starting a small business, 2-1-1 (and 3-1-1 in New York City) is there to help.

2

A Life With Asperger's

A Life with Asperger’s is a beautifully animated documentary that explores the challenges of growing up and living with Asperger’s Syndrome. It is a voice over narrative that demonstrates that Asperger’s is not simply “being a little awkward”, rather it is about adapting to one’s limitations in the face of anxiety and isolation.

3

Anxiety and Depression Association of America

This website provides helpful information for caregivers for the prevention, treatment and cure of anxiety and mood disorders, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD), and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). It also provides helpful information on school avoidance and many other related topics.

4

Building a School Responder Model

The School Responder Model (SRM) is a response to school infractions that aims to address behavioral health needs and reduce the likelihood of juvenile justice involvement. This interactive web application provides data and practical activities to address behavioral health issues.

5

Child Mind Institute

The Child Mind Institute contains a wide variety of useful information resources for families and educators. The site explores concerns and challenges faced by parents, family members and educators. Learn how to effectively respond to emotional, behavioral and learning challenges. This website also contains many personal story videos.

Th Child Mind Institute is available online or in person (in New York City), offering evaluations, treatment and neuropsychological testing for children, teens and young adults.

6

Collaborative and Proactive Solutions

Whether you're a parent or teacher...whether a child is behaviorally challenging or not...collaboration is the key to improved relationships, better communication, and solving problems. This website contains a ton of free resources to help you move in that direction. The goals of this website is to help to ensure that kids everywhere are treated in ways that are compassionate, informed, and effective.

7

Find a Behavioral Health Provider

Use this mental health online provider directory to find a behavioral health provider in New York State.

8

Interagency Coordination and Case Resolution Bureau

The Hard to Place/Hard to Serve Unit works to assist caregivers and individuals in receiving the most appropriate community-based or residential services; minimize delays in arranging services or placements; and resolves barriers that impede timely service delivery or placement. 

The Hard to Place/Hard to Serve Unit becomes involved ONLY after all program options and dispute resolution procedures have been exhausted at the local and regional levels, or if a caregiver feels their child's needs are not being met by existing systems. 

How to Make a Referral

The agent making a referral on behalf of a child must provide the Council with the following:

  • a completed Hard to Place Unit Intake Form and a signed Release of Information Form;
  • a description of the barriers encountered in attempting to provide appropriate services or placement;
  • a record of the efforts that have been made by the referral source or others to secure services and/or placements for the child; and
  • background information on the child's special needs.

A referral containing all of the information mentioned above may be submitted to:

Regina Canuso, Coordinator, Hard-to-Place/Hard-to-Serve Unit 

Kathleen Rivers, Assistant Coordinator, Hard-to-Place/Hard-to-Serve Unit

Interagency Coordination and Case Resolution Bureau
NYS Council on Children and Families
52 Washington Street
West Building, Suite 99
Rensselaer, NY 12144

Telephone: 518-473-3652
Fax: 518-473-2570
e-mail: regina.canuso@ccf.ny.gov; kathleen.rivers@ccf.ny.gov

9

Know Bullying: Bullying Prevention App

KnowBullying provides information and guidance to parents, teacher, and caregivers on ways to prevent bullying and build resilience in children. App features:

  • Conversation Starters: Start easy, meaningful conversations with your children.
  • Tips: Learn strategies to prevent bullying for ages 3—6, 7—13, and teens.
  • Warning Signs: Recognize if your child is engaging in bullying, being bullied, or witnessing bullying.
  • Reminders: Talk with your child when the time feels right: a quiet moment on the way to school or a game, during dinner, or relaxing outside.
  • Social Media: Share successful strategies and useful advice via Facebook, Twitter, email, and text messages.
  • Section for Educators: Prevent bullying in the classroom and support children who are being bullied.

10

Learning and Attention Issues - Sign and Symptoms

This web page provides a multitude of useful information to help you look at signs and symptoms to better understand child development and help you address any concerns you might have. Some of the topics include:

  • Could your Child Have a Learning or Attention Issue?
  • Typical Developmental Milestones for Preschoolers
  • Video: What Reading Fluency Looks Like in Kindergarten
  • Academic Skills your Child Needs for High School
  • Typical Developmental Milestones for Grade-Schoolers
  • How to Know if your Child is Ready for Preschool

Developed by the Council on Children and Families and Funded by the Developmental Disabilities Planning Council