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Safety for Persons with Disabilities

To keep persons with disabilities safe, parents and caregivers need to:

  • Know and learn about what things are unique concerns or a danger for their child.
  • Plan ways to protect their child and share the plan with others.
  • Remember that their child’s needs for protection will change over time.

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Safety for Persons with Disabilities

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1

2-1-1/3-1-1

2-1-1 (and 3-1-1 in New York City) are easy-to-remember numbers that helps people cut through what can be a confusing and overwhelming maze of information and resources.

2-1-1 (and 3-1-1 in New York City) helps people assess their needs and links them directly to the resources that will help. Whether you are looking for essential services, seeking volunteer opportunities or starting a small business, 2-1-1 (and 3-1-1 in New York City) is there to help.

2

Bravehearts - Motivating Others through Voices of Experiences (M.O.V.E.) NY

The mission of the Bravehearts is to empower young adults touched by the child welfare system to become active and authentic leaders in their own lives as they transition into adulthood.

Located in Westchester County, Bravehearts M.O.V.E. New York is the chapter-lead for the state and an authentic youth-led non-profit. They work to improve services and systems that support positive growth and development by uniting the voices of individuals who have lived experience in various systems including mental health, juvenile justice, education and child welfare.

A Braveheart is any young adult, aged 14-26 who has overcome adversity, persevered through difficult times and come out as a stronger and wiser version of themselves.

3

Bureau of Adult Services (BAS) Adult Protective Services

The NYS Office of Children and Family Services, through its Bureau of Adult Services, is responsible for the oversight of Protective Services for Adults (PSA) and other adult services provided through the local departments of social services, and local operations relative to Family-Type Homes for Adults (FTHA).

The Bureau provides technical assistance to adult services staff of local districts; conducts informal case reviews; participates in audits; reviews consolidated services plans; conducts complaint investigations; and develops public education, training, and interagency initiatives.

This web site is designed to provide information on Protective Services for Adults and to educate the general public on recognizing and responding to adult abuse, neglect and financial exploitation issues.

4

Dating Abuse

Dating abuse is a real problem for teens. Visit the Respect Love, Love Respect website to learn about dating abuse, how to stay safe, and things you can do if you are in an unsafe relationship. Take the Healthy Relationships quiz to learn if your relationship is a healthy one.

5

Disability.Gov

Disability.gov is the federal government website for comprehensive information about disability-related programs, services, policies, laws and regulations. The site links to thousands of resources from many different federal government agencies, as well as state and local governments and nonprofit organizations across the country.

Every day, new resources are added to Disability.gov’s 10 main subject areas: Benefits, Civil Rights, Community Life, Education, Emergency Preparedness, Employment, Health, Housing, Technology and Transportation. You’ll find information on topics such as Social Security disability benefits, job accommodations for employees with disabilities, accessible housing, and organizations in your state that can help you find a job or live independently.

Please keep in mind that Disability.gov is an “information and referral” website, which means almost every time you select a resource, you will go to another website. For example, a resource about Social Security disability benefits may direct you to  Social Security Administration (www.ssa.gov). Disability.gov is not responsible for the maintenance, accuracy or accessibility of information on these websites.

6

Education and Child Abuse and Neglect

This website provides a guide for mandated reporters in New York State; information on educational neglect; information on a Child Abuse and Maltreatment Workshop; information on child abuse in an educational setting; and a form to report child abuse in an educational setting.

7

Emergency Resource Guide - DSS

This Emergency Resource Guide provides descriptions of the many services offered by the County Department of Social Services, as well as 24 Hour emergency resource information. Although this guide was developed by Albany County, it contains mostly statewide emergency resource information.

8

endABUSE of People with Disabilities

endAbuse of People with Disabilities is a new website that provides a repository of accurate and reliable resources about the abuse of people with disabilities. Users can access multi-media content that offers information about the forms of abuse, targets of abuse, peer-to-peer support, and advocacy.  Additionally, those in need have the ability to get immediate assistance from the "Get Help Now" section which includes a "quick escape" browsing option. 

9

Fact Sheet: Restraint and Seclusion of Students with Disabilities

This fact sheet provides a series of questions and answers, issued by the Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights (OCR) to inform school districts how the use of restraint and seclusion may result in discrimination against students with disabilities in violation of federal laws that prohibit disability discrimination, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Section 504).

10

Hillside Outpatient Clinic

Provides an array of mental health services to children, adolescents and adults. Services include individual/family therapy, crisis intervention, psychiatric evaluations, pharmacotherapy and outreach and linkage to community resources. Services are designed to address mental health symptoms and improve daily functioning for the person in care.  All counseling services are provided by licensed professionals including social workers, mental health counselors, marriage and family therapists, and creative arts therapists.

Developed by the Council on Children and Families and Funded by the Developmental Disabilities Planning Council