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Self-Harm/Cutting

Self-injury, also called self-harm, is the act of deliberately harming your own body, such as cutting or burning yourself. It's typically not meant as a suicide attempt. Rather, self-injury is an unhealthy way to cope with emotional pain, intense anger and frustration.

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Self-Harm/Cutting

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Collaborative and Proactive Solutions

Whether you're a parent or teacher...whether a child is behaviorally challenging or not...collaboration is the key to improved relationships, better communication, and solving problems. This website contains a ton of free resources to help you move in that direction. The goals of this website is to help to ensure that kids everywhere are treated in ways that are compassionate, informed, and effective.

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Find a Behavioral Health Provider

Use this mental health online provider directory to find a behavioral health provider in New York State.

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Hillside Outpatient Clinic

Provides an array of mental health services to children, adolescents and adults. Services include individual/family therapy, crisis intervention, psychiatric evaluations, pharmacotherapy and outreach and linkage to community resources. Services are designed to address mental health symptoms and improve daily functioning for the person in care.  All counseling services are provided by licensed professionals including social workers, mental health counselors, marriage and family therapists, and creative arts therapists.

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Interagency Coordination and Case Resolution Bureau

The Hard to Place/Hard to Serve Unit works to assist caregivers and individuals in receiving the most appropriate community-based or residential services; minimize delays in arranging services or placements; and resolves barriers that impede timely service delivery or placement. 

The Hard to Place/Hard to Serve Unit becomes involved ONLY after all program options and dispute resolution procedures have been exhausted at the local and regional levels, or if a caregiver feels their child's needs are not being met by existing systems. 

How to Make a Referral

The agent making a referral on behalf of a child must provide the Council with the following:

  • a completed Hard to Place Unit Intake Form and a signed Release of Information Form;
  • a description of the barriers encountered in attempting to provide appropriate services or placement;
  • a record of the efforts that have been made by the referral source or others to secure services and/or placements for the child; and
  • background information on the child's special needs.

A referral containing all of the information mentioned above may be submitted to:

Regina Canuso, Coordinator, Hard-to-Place/Hard-to-Serve Unit 

Kathleen Rivers, Assistant Coordinator, Hard-to-Place/Hard-to-Serve Unit

Interagency Coordination and Case Resolution Bureau
NYS Council on Children and Families
52 Washington Street
West Building, Suite 99
Rensselaer, NY 12144

Telephone: 518-473-3652
Fax: 518-473-2570
e-mail: regina.canuso@ccf.ny.gov; kathleen.rivers@ccf.ny.gov

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Mental Health Program Directory

The Mental Health Program Directory is a searchable list of programs that are licensed by the NYS Office of Mental Health (OMH) and programs that are funded by OMH that do not need a license to operate. Users can:

  • Search for mental health programs by county, program category or subcategory.
  • View program details such as program name, address and phone number.
  • Click on any county on the map to view all of the programs in that county
  • View program definitions

Types of searchable programs and services included in the directory: psychiatric emergency programs; crisis intervention services; inpatient and outpatient treatment options; supports, including respite services; and vocational services. 

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Mental Health Resources for College Students

Although this resource is provides college students and young people with quality information on maintaining good mental health and identifying mental health issues, it is not meant to take the place of professional advice from a qualified mental health specialist. Some of the most common mental health issues facing college students include: Depression; Anxiety; Suicide; Bipolar Disorder; Eating Disorders; Addiction; Self-harm; and Struggles with Identity.

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Parent Guides on Social and Emotional Development

The NYS Office of Mental Health developed a set of parent guides to help parents better understand their child's social emotional development from ages 1 - 18. These guides provide information on what to expect, what you can do, when to be concerned and how to get help.

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Suicide Crisis Telephone Numbers by County

This list of suicide crisis phone numbers includes numbers for local county mental health clinics or the mental health units of hospitals, as these are the only places equipped to handle crisis calls in some counties.

Developed by the Council on Children and Families and Funded by the Developmental Disabilities Planning Council