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Life Skill Development

Life skills development includes learning skills like how to dress and groom properly, use appropriate table manners, make decisions about money, and use transportation to get to work. The three major skill areas that need to be addressed are daily living, personal/social, and occupational skills. 

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Life Skill Development

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1

10 Tips for Voters With Disabilities

The following tips from the U.S. Election Assistance Commission examine the options available to help voters with disabilities vote privately and independently.

2

9 Tips to Improve Your Communication Skills

Communication is an essential part of work and home life. Understanding how to be a good communicator can be an important productivity tool, one that’s frequently neglected. Poor communication can often have disastrous results; lost time, injured feelings, frustration, ineffective meetings, unproductive teamwork, resulting in a general lack of career advancement and goal achievement. To become effective communicators we need to be aware of a few fundamental tips we can use in our work and life interactions. Regardless of the situation, the same rules apply.

3

A Guide to College Savings Plans

There are special tax-free college savings plans available to help set aside money for college that can grow into substantial savings. This guide is intended to help tomorrow's college students determine the best way to save money for college expenses. It highlights the advantages of various college savings plans and differences between each savings option.

4

Accessibility Animations

This website contains a number of animated videos displaying and describing the American's with Disabilities (ADA) guidelines and standards. Captioned videos are also provided.

5

Accessing Home and Community-Based Services: A Guide for Self-Advocates

Accessing Home and Community-Based Services: A Guide for Self Advocates is a tool designed to help people with disabilities, families, and friends find and use available resources. This may include family and friends, community-based services, state funded waivers and programs, and other resources to help empower people with disabilities to live as independently as possible and make our own choices about what we need. It is a tool to inform about various resources and how to access them. It is also a reference about resources that, although you may not need or want them now, you can use in the future.

6

ADA, Section 504 & Postsecondary Education

It is important that students and their advocates become knowledgeable about their rights and responsibilities in postsecondary education. Although protections exist, the students have considerably more responsibility in postsecondary education to request their own accommodations. This responsibility is ongoing. For many students with disabilities, good self-advocacy skills are the key to success, and knowing their rights is one essential element of effective self-advocacy.

7

ADA.Gov

The ADA requires the Department of Justice to provide technical assistance to businesses, State and local governments, and individuals with rights or responsibilities under the law. The Department provides education and technical assistance through a variety of means to encourage voluntary compliance. Activities include providing direct technical assistance and guidance to the public through this ADA Website and the ADA Information Line, developing and disseminating technical assistance materials to the public, and undertaking outreach initiatives.

ADA Information Line

The Department of Justice operates a toll-free ADA Information Line to provide information and materials to the public about the requirements of the ADA.  ADA Specialists, who assist callers in understanding how the ADA applies to their situation, are available on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday from 9:30 a.m. until 5:30 p.m. (Eastern Time) and on Thursday from 12:30 p.m. until 5:30 p.m. (Eastern Time). Calls are confidential. To get answers to technical questions, obtain general ADA information, order free ADA materials, or ask about filing a complaint, please call: 800-514-0301 (voice); 800-514-0383 (TTY)

ADA Technical Assistance Materials

Copies of the Department's ADA regulations, technical assistance publications, and some videos can be obtained on this website, by calling the ADA Information Line, or writing to the address listed below. Publications are available in standard print and alternate format. Some publications are available in foreign languages.

U.S. Department of Justice
Civil Rights Division
950 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W.
Disability Rights Section - NYAV
Washington, D.C. 20530

8

Become a Youth Peer Advocate (YPA)

Are you a young person who is between the ages of 18 and 30 years old with first-hand experience with mental health, special education, or foster care services? Are you curious about ways you could help a younger person who is facing some of the same challenges you faced?

If so, consider becoming a Youth Peer Advocate (YPA). Learn more about how you can use your own experience with recovery to make a positive impact in another young person’s life.

9

Casey Life Sills (CLS) Assessment Tool

The Casey Life Skills (CLS) tool is a tool for youth to build their own personal checklist of skills and strengths. It shows them what they know already and what is possible for them to learn in the future. A case worker or mentor needs to help them create a free account.

10

Coming Home: Transitioning Back Into the Community - A Resources Directory

A New York City resource directory for court-involved youth leaving detention and returning to the community. The goal of this publication is to provide resources for young people in order to create working, engaged and responsible adults who can contribute to the community.

Developed by the Council on Children and Families and Funded by the Developmental Disabilities Planning Council