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Educational Planning

Educational planning is the process of preparing for post-secondary education. Effective educational planning enables individuals to make a smooth transition from high school or military service to college or further technical education. A good educational plan will provides a map of future education and career goals.

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Educational Planning

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1

A Comparison of ADA, IDEA, and Section 504

This fact sheet offers a comparison of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.

2

Child Mind Institute

The Child Mind Institute contains a wide variety of useful information resources for families and educators. The site explores concerns and challenges faced by parents, family members and educators. Learn how to effectively respond to emotional, behavioral and learning challenges. This website also contains many personal story videos.

3

College - You Can Do It!

In this video presentation, students with disabilities and staff share advice for success in college. It is designed for high school students with disabilities preparing for college.

4

College-level Reading - Tips and Tools to Help with Comprehension and Fluency

This is a guide for parents and students and provides a quick overview of tools and strategies to aid comprehension and fluency while reading college level text.

5

College: You Can Do It! Tip Sheet

This tip sheet provides helpful information to help students with disabilities prepare for college.

The document covers three phases: 

  • Preparing for college while in high school.
  • Staying in college, which requires numerous self-management skills.
  • Preparing to move beyond college and into a career.

6

Disability Scholarships

Passed in 1990, the Americans with Disabilities Act has required schools to accommodate the needs of their disabled students, breaking down many barriers that prevented students from accessing educational resources, and enabling more people to enjoy the full benefits of a college education. Recruitment efforts and financial aid opportunities aimed at disabled students now exist at a number of schools. Additionally, many private organizations award scholarship money to ensure that students with disabilities are able to achieve their college goals, despite potential setbacks such as learning issues, environmental challenges, or medical conflicts.

Disability scholarships exist to provide college funding for students who possess numerous cognitive, behavioral, and emotional impediments that would make it difficult to attain a college degree. These scholarship opportunities help deserving students stay in school and out of debt, allowing them to more easily achieve their educational and career goals.

Disability scholarships are funded by a variety of scholarship providers with different requirements. They can be intended to help students with a specific disability pay for school, or they can be aimed at a wider range of students who have physical or mental issues. Disability scholarship providers may choose to narrow their awards towards students who have completed a specific program or who will attend a particular college or university. Some scholarship awards are aimed at groups that face multiple barriers to education; such as low-income, minority, or females with disabilities. Certain local scholarships might also be earmarked for disabled students.

 

7

Early Childhood Transition Process

This guide provides information to help families of children with special needs prepare for smooth and effective transtions. It includes general information on the rights and responsibilities of families as well as eligibility under IDEA and Settings for Preschool, School Registration Requirements, Program Options for 4-year-olds and Areas of Development.

8

Frequently Asked Questions about Special Education

This webpage answers many frequently asked questions regarding special education issues - accommodations and modifications, advocacy, damages, discipline, due process hearings, progress, reading, parent-school relations, high-stakes testing, retention, No Child Left Behind, and other topics. You will find answers to many of your questions here.

9

Getting Help for Struggling Students

This tip sheet highlights a variety of resources available to students who need help with school. It includes information on Supplemental Educational Services (SES); Academic Intervention Services (AIS); P-3 Letters; and private tutoring programs.

10

Guide to Trade and Vocational Schools (Online)

Today’s economy demands a skilled, trained, and educated workforce and completing post-secondary degree or certificate programs has become a prerequisite for an increasing number of occupations. In fact, research from the Center for Education and the Workforce at Georgetown University projected that by 2018, nearly two-thirds of all jobs in the United States will require some type of postsecondary education. With that in mind, in his 2009 State of the Union Address, President Obama issued a challenge to every American–commit to completing at least one year of post-secondary education or training.

Developed by the Council on Children and Families and Funded by the Developmental Disabilities Planning Council