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Hearing Impairment/Deafness

Hearing Impairment/Deafness refers to individuals with partial or complete hearing loss, generally in the severe to profound range, that is present at birth or occurs later in life. Functionally, individuals who are termed "deaf" are unable to hear well enough to rely on their hearing and use it as a means of processing information.

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Hearing Impairment/Deafness

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1

A Comparison of ADA, IDEA, and Section 504

This fact sheet offers a comparison of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.

2

Assistive Technology Basics / Finding an Assistive Technology

This web page provides comprehensive information on assistive technologies for children with learning and attention issues. The resources on this page include:

  • Who Pays for Assistive Technology? Parents or Schools?
  • Checklist: What to Consider When Looking at Assistive Technology
  • Assistive Technology that's Built into Mobile Devices
  • Checklist: What to ask the School before Choosing a Tool or Device
  • 10 New Apps for Grade-Schools with Learning and Attention Issues

3

College: You Can Do It! Tip Sheet

This tip sheet provides helpful information to help students with disabilities prepare for college.

The document covers three phases: 

  • Preparing for college while in high school.
  • Staying in college, which requires numerous self-management skills.
  • Preparing to move beyond college and into a career.

4

Disability Rights NY Hotlines & Resources

All requests for assistance are processed by DRNY's Intake Office. The vast majority of requests for assistance are received and processed by telephone or TTY. The intake office is available to conduct telephone or in-person intake interviews Monday through Friday between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m, and includes Spanish speaking staff.

5

Early Childhood Transition Process

This guide provides information to help families of children with special needs prepare for smooth and effective transtions. It includes general information on the rights and responsibilities of families as well as eligibility under IDEA and Settings for Preschool, School Registration Requirements, Program Options for 4-year-olds and Areas of Development.

6

Early Intervention Program

The New York State Early Intervention Program (EIP) is part of the nationwide EIP. It is for infants and toddlers under three years of age who may not be making progress like other children because of a developmental delay or disability. A disability means that a child has a diagnosed physical or mental condition that may lead to developmental problems. These include, but are not limited to, autism, Down syndrome, motor disorders, or vision and hearing problems. A developmental delay means a child is behind in some area of development, such as growth, learning and thinking, or communicating.

The first step is your child's referral to the EIP in the county where you live. All counties in New York State (NYS) and New York City have an EIP. Children who may need services must first be referred to the EIP. Parents can refer their own child to the EIP if they have a concern about their child's development. In NYS, certain professionals are required to refer children to the EIP if a developmental problem is suspected. After referral, your child will be evaluated by qualified professionals. Your county EIP or the New York City EIP will help you get services if your child is found to be eligible. Health insurance, including private insurance and Medicaid, may be used to pay for early intervention services. EIP services must be provided at no cost to you and will not affect your insurance coverage.

View Early Intervention Programs using our MSNavigator Mapping Tool.

 

7

Equipment Loan Fund for the Disabled

This brochure explains the various components of the NYS Office of Children and Family Services (OCFS) Equipment Loan Fund where disabled residents of New York State are eligible. Money is loaned either directly to the disabled person or to another person responsible for the individual. 

8

Growing Up Healthy Hotline

The Department of Health operates the Growing Up Healthy Hotline, which provides information about health care, nutrition and other health and human services. The hotline provides information and referral 24 hours/day, seven days a week in English and Spanish and other languages.

9

Interagency Case Resolution Unit

The Interagency Case Resolution Unit works to assist caregivers and individuals in receiving the most appropriate community-based or residential services; minimize delays in arranging services or placements, and resolves barriers that impede timely service delivery or placement. 

The Interagency Case Resolution Unit becomes involved ONLY after all program options and dispute resolution procedures have been exhausted at the local and regional levels, or if a caregiver feels their child's needs are not being met by existing systems. 

How to Make a Referral

The agent making a referral on behalf of a child must provide the Council with the following:

  • a completed Intake Form and a signed Release of Information Form;
  • a description of the barriers encountered in attempting to provide appropriate services or placement;
  • a record of the efforts that have been made by the referral source or others to secure services and/or placements for the child; and
  • background information on the child's special needs.

A referral containing all of the information mentioned above may be submitted to:

Sheila Jackson, Coordinator, Interagency Case Resolution Unit 

Kathleen Rivers, Assistant Coordinator, Interagency Case Resolution Unit

Interagency Case Resolution Unit
NYS Council on Children and Families
52 Washington Street
West Building, Suite 99
Rensselaer, NY 12144

Telephone: 518-473-3652
Fax: 518-473-2570
e-mail: sheila.jackson@ccf.ny.gov; kathleen.rivers@ccf.ny.gov

10

Person Centered Planning and Inclusion

The NYS Office for Persons with Developmental Disabilities (OPWDD) has defined the process and details essential to the success of the person centered planning process designed to achieve personal outcomes identified by the person themselves.

Developed by the Council on Children and Families and Funded by the Developmental Disabilities Planning Council