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Financial Aid

Financial Aid Programs enable students who demonstrate financial need to obtain the financial assistance they require to meet their educational and living expenses while in school. Most students receive a financial aid package which includes aid from a combination of sources that may include loans, scholarships, grants, work-study awards, and fellowships or assistant-ships for graduate students. 

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Financial Aid

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1

2-1-1/3-1-1

2-1-1 (and 3-1-1 in New York City) are easy-to-remember numbers that helps people cut through what can be a confusing and overwhelming maze of information and resources.

2-1-1 (and 3-1-1 in New York City) helps people assess their needs and links them directly to the resources that will help. Whether you are looking for essential services, seeking volunteer opportunities or starting a small business, 2-1-1 (and 3-1-1 in New York City) is there to help.

2

A Guide to College Savings Plans

There are special tax-free college savings plans available to help set aside money for college that can grow into substantial savings. This guide is intended to help tomorrow's college students determine the best way to save money for college expenses. It highlights the advantages of various college savings plans and differences between each savings option.

3

Adult Career and Continuing Education Services - Vocational Rehabilitation (ACCES-VR)

Adult Career and Continuing Education Services-Vocational Rehabilitation (ACCES-VR) starts with the presumption that all individuals with disabilities can benefit from vocational rehabilitation services and should have opportunities to work in jobs integrated within their communities. Vocational rehabilitation counselors guide individuals through service programs they need to reach their employment goal.

Adult Career and Continuing Education Services - Vocational Rehabilitation (ACCES-VR) offers access to a full range of employment and independent living services that may be needed by persons with disabilities throughout their lives.

It's important to note that a special education classification is not necessary to receive vocational assistance from ACCES-VR. An individual must have a disability that interferes with getting or keeping a job; be able to benefit from vocational rehabilitation services; need VR services to get, keep or advance at a job

This resource includes links to many informative brochures and web pages.

4

Adult Career and Continuing Education Services - Vocational Rehabilitation (ACCES-VR) District Offices

Adult Career and Continuing Education Services-Vocational Rehabilitation (ACCES-VR) starts with the presumption that all individuals with disabilities can benefit from vocational rehabilitation services and should have opportunities to work in jobs integrated within their communities. Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors guide individuals through service programs they need to reach their employment goal.

Adult Career and Continuing Education Services - Vocational Rehabilitation (ACCES-VR) offers access to a full range of employment and independent living services that may be needed by persons with disabilities throughout their lives.

Use this interactive map to locate the ACCES-VR office in your county.

5

College: You Can Do It! Tip Sheet

This tip sheet provides helpful information to help students with disabilities prepare for college.

The document covers three phases: 

  • Preparing for college while in high school.
  • Staying in college, which requires numerous self-management skills.
  • Preparing to move beyond college and into a career.

6

Disability Scholarships

Passed in 1990, the Americans with Disabilities Act has required schools to accommodate the needs of their disabled students, breaking down many barriers that prevented students from accessing educational resources, and enabling more people to enjoy the full benefits of a college education. Recruitment efforts and financial aid opportunities aimed at disabled students now exist at a number of schools. Additionally, many private organizations award scholarship money to ensure that students with disabilities are able to achieve their college goals, despite potential setbacks such as learning issues, environmental challenges, or medical conflicts.

Disability scholarships exist to provide college funding for students who possess numerous cognitive, behavioral, and emotional impediments that would make it difficult to attain a college degree. These scholarship opportunities help deserving students stay in school and out of debt, allowing them to more easily achieve their educational and career goals.

Disability scholarships are funded by a variety of scholarship providers with different requirements. They can be intended to help students with a specific disability pay for school, or they can be aimed at a wider range of students who have physical or mental issues. Disability scholarship providers may choose to narrow their awards towards students who have completed a specific program or who will attend a particular college or university. Some scholarship awards are aimed at groups that face multiple barriers to education; such as low-income, minority, or females with disabilities. Certain local scholarships might also be earmarked for disabled students.

7

Disability.Gov

Disability.gov is the federal government website for comprehensive information about disability-related programs, services, policies, laws and regulations. The site links to thousands of resources from many different federal government agencies, as well as state and local governments and nonprofit organizations across the country.

Every day, new resources are added to Disability.gov’s 10 main subject areas: Benefits, Civil Rights, Community Life, Education, Emergency Preparedness, Employment, Health, Housing, Technology and Transportation. You’ll find information on topics such as Social Security disability benefits, job accommodations for employees with disabilities, accessible housing, and organizations in your state that can help you find a job or live independently.

Please keep in mind that Disability.gov is an “information and referral” website, which means almost every time you select a resource, you will go to another website. For example, a resource about Social Security disability benefits may direct you to  Social Security Administration (www.ssa.gov). Disability.gov is not responsible for the maintenance, accuracy or accessibility of information on these websites.

8

Higher Education Services Corporation (HESC) Questions

This information line provides answers to general TAP questions, assistance in applying for TAP, TAP changes, status inquires, application problems, user account issues and FAFSA filing.

9

How to Get A Degree Without Debt

This guide provides guidance on keeping debt burdens to manageable levels. The guide provides strategies and tactics that can bring individuals closer to their goal of graduating without debt — or with very little debt.

10

Scholarships & Financial Aid for Students with Disabilities

Students with disabilities deserve an education just like every other student. And like the majority of college students, students with disabilities often have trouble finding ways to pay for school and school related costs. There are many special scholarships and financial aid opportunities intended for particular students, such as minority students, those studying a particular field or applicants with a notable academic record. There are also special financial aid and scholarship opportunities for students with disabilities. The purpose of this guide is to focus on these financial aid opportunities and discuss how to take advantage of them.

Developed by the Council on Children and Families and Funded by the Developmental Disabilities Planning Council